Categories
ART HAPPENS

Jeremy Johnson at Street 14

For Astoria’s second Saturday Art Walk on April 9, Street 14 Coffeehouse will be holding an artist’s reception from 5-9 p.m. for photographer, Jeremy W. Johnson. “Time Come to Pass”, features “traditionally” printed black and white photographs The images intend to serve as visual prompts for reflection on assorted experiences, for the purpose of illustrating a few commonalities we all share. ST. 14 Coffee is located at the corner of 14th and Commercial in Astoria.

Categories
NETWORK

Network – Community Listings

WORKSHOPS/CLASSES
Beginning Birding Class. Thursday, April 26. Discovery Coast Audubon Education Coordinator Mary Atherton will teach a one-hour Beginning Birding class emphasizing herons. Free, 2pm in the conference room at Lighthouse oceanfront Resort in Long Beach, WA.
Keeping Family Forests & Farms in the Family. part 2. Saturday, April 16, from 9am -2pm at the OSU Extension Center in Astoria. FMI 503-325-8573.
Storytelling Workshop. From Fact to Fiction with author Jane Kirkpatrick. Saturday, April 16. She will talk about facts and fiction and the writer’s craft of weaving them together to tell a good story. Registration forms at http://hoffmanblog.org/manzanita-writers-series/. Workshops-2011-2 $25, 2-4pm at the Hoffman Center in Manzanita.
Photoshop for Photographers. LightBox Photographic will offer an 8 week course starting Tuesday, May 10 and continuing until June 28, 2011. 90 minute sessions begin at 6:30pm with time for review. Classes are limited to 15 students. Cost is $299.00 LightBox will offer a four week class in PowerPoint starting in June. The workshop is designed for the serious beginning and intermediate and will cover practical skills needed to use the application. instructor Tom Dickerson, photographer, graphic design- er and image maker will help you to fully understand the use of Photoshop application. Call LightBox to reserve: 503.468.0328, info@lightbox-photgraphic.com.
FREE WORKSHOP DEMOS MICROSOFT OFFICE 2010. With the latest software release of Microsoft’s office 2010, the Astoria Warrenton Area Chamber of Commerce is partnering with Clatsop Economic Development Resources and Microsoft to bring a free workshop to businesses and individuals interested in learning about the changes and new features before purchasing. Attendees will learn about the newest release and how it differs from 2007 and 2003 versions, how it may maximize production
and whether it is a wise technology investment. The workshop is scheduled for Tuesday, October 12th, 8am to 10am at the Holiday Inn Express in Astoria. Business owner Jane Francis of Personal Computer Training will facilitate the workshop. Microsoft has provided door prizes, and refreshments will be served. The event is open to the public and reservations are required due to space limitations by calling Rose Alsbury at the Astoria Warrenton Chamber, 503.325.6311 or by email to rose@oldoregon.com.
DOES FOOD RUN YOUR LIFE? Come to Overeaters Anonymous every Wednesday from 7-8pm in the Seaside public library, Board Room B. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Everyone welcome! (if you have questions call 503-505- 1721).
FREE COMPUTER CLASSES AT TILLAMOOK COUNTY LIBRARIES. Tillamook County libraries will be offering free basic computer classes this fall. Sign up for a free one-on-one session where you can ask questions and learn at your own pace. Classes will be held on Saturdays at the Tillamook County Library, September 11th, 18th and 25th and October 2nd and 9th. Additional sessions will be held at library branches in October and November. Registration is limited, so contact your local library soon and reserve your space.
SPIRITUAL WRITING FOR MEN AND WOMEN. Instructor Gail Balden is a writer, educator and workshop presenter with over 30 years of teaching experience. Her work has been published in anthologies, literary journals and national magazines. She teaches one-day writing workshops and writes a monthly column on the joys of small town life for the north Coast Citizen. Visit her web site at www.creativejourneys.net.
LIFE DRAWING. Every Wednesday, 3-5pm, The Alabaster Jar, 1184 Commercial St, Astoria 503-325-8632.
French Conversation Group Re-Start. The group is devoted to speaking French only. it is not a class, so please do not show up expecting to learn French from scratch. Once you step through the door of the Riverbend Room, it is French only. It will be on Saturdays, from 1-3pm at NCRD in the Riverbend Room. There is a nominal charge of $1/person/time. For more information email Jane or call her 503-368-3901 or, call Paul Miller at 503-368-5715.
Library2Go Basics. Second Saturday of each month 9:00am-10:00am. Over 5000 audio books and videos can be downloaded to computers and digital devices through the Library2Go database accessible through the Astoria Public Library web site. All downloads are free to access with your library card. Learn the how to make the most of this extraordinary resource. Free, at the Astoria public library.
Computer Basics. Third Saturday of each month 9:00am- 10:00am. If you’re new to PC computers or just needing to update basic skills, this class is for you. Each class is tailored to meet the needs of participants. Free, at the Astoria Public Library.
The Lower Columbia Classics Car Club. Invitation to all who are interested in Collector Cars to attend one of our monthly meetings. The meetings are held at Steve Jordan’s Shop Building, located at 35232 Helligso lane in rural Astoria – meet on the 3rd Thursday of each month. If you are interested and need the directions to get there, you may call Steve Jordan at 503-325-1807.
Library2Go. Classes will be held on the 2nd Saturday of each month, in the Flag Room of the Astoria Public Library, 450 10th Street, Astoria. This class is free of charge and open to everyone. Please contact the library for details and registration at 503-325-7323 or comments@astorialibrary.org.
Open Art Night. 5:30 to 7 PM –1st & 3rd Weds. Bay City Arts Center, Bay City.
Life Drawing. 6 to 9 PM. every 2nd & 4th Weds. Bay City Arts Center, Bay City.
Toddler Arts Group. Every Monday, 10:30 to 11:30 – Get your toddler started in the arts! Activities are geared towards ages 1–3, but age birth–5 are welcome. All children must be accompanied by a caregiver. Bay City Arts Center, Bay City.
Clay Open-Studio. At the Hoffman Center Annex, 594 Laneda, Manzanita, Tuesdays 10-7pm for those 12 & over. Children’s clay open studio is on Thursdays from 3-5. open to all clay artists, or those who wish to learn with a supportive group. Center equipment available includes a slab roller, two potter’s wheels, a variety of tools and kiln time. $2 p/hour or $10 p/day per person. FMI: contact Glenna Gray 368-3739 or glenna@nehalemtel.net.
CELEBRATE RECOVERY. Nazarene Church, 2611 3rd St, Tillamook. Adult & teen 12 step program. Child care provided. Call 503-812-3522 for more information. Tuesdays, 7-9, dinner at 6 by donation.
OPEN ART NIGHT WITH PHAEDRA. Bay City Arts Center, 5680 A St, 5-7pm on Wednesdays.


BODY WORK•YOGA•FITNESS
YOGA NAMASTE. The Spring 2011 Yoga schedule starts March 28 and ends June 4, 2011. During the 10 week term you can enjoy GENTLE YOGA–LEVEL 1 at 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays. LEVEL 1-2 (Beginner and intermediate) Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays at 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. level 2-3 (intermediate and advanced) Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays at 6:15 to 8:45 a.m. LEVEL 1-2 Yoga flow at 9:30 to 11:00 a.m. on Saturdays. For more information: www.yoganam.com or call: 503 440 9761.
YOGA RESTORATIVE. Private individual Therapeutic and Restorative Yoga instruction with certified, Yoga Alliance registered yoga teacher SarahFawn Wilson, MA, RYT-500. Private group classes also available. For more information and for public class schedule, please call 503-440-6738 or email serraphon@msn.com.
ECSTATIC DANCE. Ecstatic, trance, yogic, spirit filled, playful, improvisational, freestyle – We’re dancing! Wed. at 6:30 at Pine Grove Community house, 225 Laneda Ave. in Manzanita. no experience necessary. You are welcome to bring instruments of any sort to play along with what we’ve got going. Cost is a sliding scale from $5 – $7, or free if you really need to just be there.
Tsunami Dance. SUNDAY SANCTUARY – A class to celebrate and explore body, mind, and spirit within our dance, 6 to 8 pm. Free-form dance. Arrive at 6pm for a half hour of meditation before moving into an hour of dance. drop-in as you wish at $12 per class. FMI: Contact: Lisa (lisa@theplayfulspirit.com, 503-860-7711). At Lotus Yoga Studio, 1230 Marine Dr. in Astoria. Begins August 15.
LOTUS YOGA. 1230 Marine drive, downtown Astoria. ongoing classes on a month to month basis. evening Classes Monday thru Thursday 6:00 PM: Monday Level 1 Yoga for Relaxation. Tuesday Level 2 Strengthening. Wednesday Level 1 Beginning Flow. Thursday Llevel 2 Advanced Flow. Morning class Friday 9:00AM All level THERAPEUTIC Yoga. Dedicated to making Yoga an accessible part of everyday living. Call (503)298-3874, email lotusyoga@live.com, website www.lotusyogaonline.com for more information.
YOGA NAMASTÉ. The Spring 2011 Yoga schedule at Yoga namasté starts March 28 and ends June 4. During the 11 week term you can enjoy GENTLE YOGA-Level 1 at 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays and Fridays. Level 1-2 (Beginner and Intermediate) Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays at 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. Level 2-3 (Intermediate and Advanced) Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays at 6:15 to 8:45 a.m. Level 1-2 Yoga flow at 9:30 to 11:00 a.m. on Saturdays. For more information: www.yoganam.com or call: 503 440 9761.
YOGA SMA EXPLORATION. Yoga instructor Linda Sanderlin LMT, introduces SMA yoga, a practice evolved from Feldenkrais and Alexander technique, found to be very effective for people with a limited range of motion. Tues. and Sat. classes at Parinamah in Manzanita. $5 p/class. FMI: Call Linda (503)867-3943; or via e-mail: 4lsanderlin@gmail.com.
YOGA NCRD. Monday, Yoga of The Heart, 8:15 am – 9:45 am instructor: Lorraine Ortiz (no drop ins). Monday, Level II, 5:45 pm – 7:15 pm instructor: Nicole Hamic. Wednesday, Yoga Stretch, 8:15 am – 9:45 am instructor: Lucy Brook. Thursday, level I, 5:45 pm – 7:15 pm instructor: Charlene Gernert. Friday, Very Gentle Yoga, 8:15 am – 9:45 am instructor: Lucy Brook. Saturday, Mixed levels, 8:00 am – 9:30 am instructor: Lorraine Ortiz.
YOGA • Manzanita. The Center for the Contemplative Arts, Manzanita: Tuesday evenings 5 – 5:45pm. $35 for 5 classes. Call 368-6227 for more info.
YOGA IN GEARHART. Gearhart Workout. For more information log on to www.gearhartworkout.com 3470 Hwy. 101 N. Suite 104 in Gearhart.
YOGA • Nehalem. Ongoing Yoga classes at NCRD are as follows: Monday, level II, 5:15-6:45 pm, Nicole Hamic; Wednesday, Morning Yoga Stretch, 8-9:30 am, Lucy Brook; Thursday, Yoga for Parents & Kids, 3:45-4:45 pm, Charlene Gernert; Thursday, level I, 5:45 – 7:15 pm, Charlene Gernet; Friday, Very Gentle Yoga, 8-9:30 am, Lucy Brook.
T’AI CHI. The Center for the Contemplative Arts, Manzanita: Wednesday Mornings 10-11:30. $30/month. Call 368-6227 for more info.
TAEKWON-DO. Confidence, discipline, self-esteem and respect are only a few of the traits you will develop in this class while improving overall fitness. Ages: 8 -Adult fami- lies welcome! Mondays / Wednesdays, 6:00 – 7:00pm, through June 17th. Session Fee: $24 Resident’s Card / $36 non-resident. location: Bob Chisholm Community Center – 1225 Ave. A, Seaside. For registration call the pool: 503-738-3311 Center – 1225 Ave. A, Seaside.
LEARN SELF DEFENSE IN ILWACO. Kenpo Karate for Adults. River City School, 127 Se lake St, Tuesdays @ 7:00pm – 8:45pm, $45/mo inquire/sign up: jbgroove1@juno.com, phone: 360-665-0860. 7:00pm – 8:45pm, KenpoKarate for Kids -River City School, 127 Lake Street SE, Ilwaco, every Thursday @ 4:00pm – 5:00pm, $45/mo.


SPIRITUALITY
Art as Soul Encounter. Saturday, April 23. Taught by Amy Livingstone. Workshop participants will: reclaim art as your sacred inheritance; cultivate mystical awareness by taking time to slow down and reconnect with the wonder and awe of creation; practice simple ways to break open your hearts through deep listening and expressing through art process; allow for the expression of both light and dark; look at ways your creativity can be of service to the world. 10am – 4:30pm at Ruby Too Art Studio in nehalem. For more information or to sign up contact Glenna Gray, 503-368-3739 or glenna@nehalemtel.net.
TIBETAN BUDDHIST DHARMA GROUP. Dharma River, meets Mondays 7:30 – 9 pm, 1230 Marine Dr., Suite 304 in Lotus Yoga’s studio. Meditation, sadhana practice, teachings & discussion. Dharma River is a satellite of the Portland Sakya Center. Contact Dharma teacher, Rosetta Hurley, 338-9704 for more info.
Center For Spiritual Living of the North Coast. CSLNC is for those who want to grow spiritually, all faiths and paths welcome. Sunday Celebration and Children’s Church 10:30 a.m, 66 4th St., Warrenton. www.centerforspiritualliving.org and 503-791-2192.
A SILENT MEDITATION • with Lola Sacks. St. Catherine’s Center for the Contemplative Arts, Manzanita: Monday nights 5 – 5:45 Call 368-6227 for more info.
LECTIO DIVINA • Meditation with Holy Scripture. The Center for the Contemplative Arts, Manzanita: Tuesday Mornings 10-11:30. Call 368-6227 for more info.
LABYRINTH WALK. Grace Episcopal Church, 1545 Franklin St, Astoria, 3-6. every 1st Sunday.


VOLUNTEER
Weekly Alder Creek Farm Community Garden. Work parties – Tuesdays, 10 am – noon.    help out the Coastal Food Ecology Center, community garden, permaculture garden and harvesting for the Wheeler Food Bank. Tasks may include: greenhouse and garden weeding, planting, and watering.


MEETINGS
ENCORE Retirement Learning Community is an association of retirement-age people who share a love of learning. Established in 2001 by a Steering Committee of retired adults, ENCORE is sponsored by Clatsop Community College. We meet for lunch the first Tuesday of every month. We try to alternate between north and South County, so look for these Community notes in your local newspaper to see the place of choice. our lunch Bunch get-togethers are a wonderful venue for meeting classmates over lunch, as well as new friends. Remember all guests that might be interested in ENCORE, or just want to know what we’re all about, are welcome. please call Madeline Gobel, 503 325-3330.
BREASTFEEDING INFORMATION & SUPPORT. La Leche League’s monthly support group meetings provide an opportunity for both new and experienced mothers to share their questions or concerns, and to talk with each other about the special joys and challenges of parenting. We especially encourage expectant and new mothers to join us. Healthy babies and toddlers are always welcome at La Leche League meetings. We look forward to seeing you soon. Second Monday of the month at 10am- Astoria.


GET ‘ER DONE!
ASTORIA DOWNTOWN CLEAN-UP DAY APRIL 17. ADHDA Downtown Clean-Up Day is Sunday, April 17 from 9 a.m. to 12 noon and is looking for volunteers, in preparation for the Astoria Sunday Market, tourist season and the Astoria Bicentennial Celebration opening events. All necessary cleaning supplies and lunch will be provided to volunteers. If you are interested in participating in this community event please contact Blaire Buergler at 503.791.7940 or blaire@astoriadowntown.com.
FREE DUMP DAY. in conjunction with the Downtown Clean-Up Day, the 2011 Spring Community Clean-Up Event is also scheduled for Sunday, April 17 at the Astoria Transfer Station. This is the day residential trash is accepted at no charge (certain restrictions apply). The event will be held from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the transfer station on Williamsport Road. The event is open only to residents within Astoria city limits who are Western Oregon Waste customers. Everyone is encouraged to help to make our City more attractive. Clean your yards, sidewalks, and pick up trash – anything to help clean up our City.
SHRED IT. In addition to Sunday’s events, Clatsop Coin, Clatsop Community Bank, Knutsen insurance, and TC Home Furnishings are sponsoring a community “Shred-It” event on Saturday, April 16. There will be a SHRED-IT truck outside of the Astoria Branch of Clatsop Community Bank in downtown Astoria between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. This is an opportunity to properly dispose of any documents that contain personal information. There is a suggested $5 donation per “banker box” or large trash bag. Volunteers are needed to help with this event as well.
Rummage Sale Astoria Middle School. There will be a rummage sale at Astoria Middle School on Saturday and Sunday April 16-17, to benefit – and held by – the students going on the New York/Washington DC trip this June. Saturday’s hours will be between 9am and 5pm; Sunday’s, between 10am and 3pm. If you’ve done your spring cleaning and need to get rid of some items we would be happy to take your donations for the sale. items in bags and boxes will be taken the week of April 11-15; large items can be taken after 5pm on Friday, April 15. Come and support these students in their efforts to defray the cost of the trip, drop some stuff, and rummage through looking for treasures! For more information, call Matthew Hensley at Astoria Middle school:  503-325-4331.

Categories
COLUMNS Word & Wisdom

We’re Back!

I like that phrase. In this case, I’m referring to Hipfish. I am just so pleased it is back up and running. Not sure how Dinah did it. Does it. Keeps on going. Keeps on moving. Its admirable. Feeling pleased is a pleasant emotion to have these days. When things seem tough, and every day events around the world  are sure to depress, I find it inspiring to see one, such as Dinah, pick herself off, get the dust off and start in again. Thanks, Dinah, for demonstrating such grit.

I think you have to recognize something, such as perseverence or stamina, in order to admire it. I admire those that can survive with grace.

For a while there, maybe in the ‘80’s I wondered if we were becoming a nation of whiners. Striving for all the wrong things. Overextending in unhealthy ways. Whining when glitches and problems arose. Money solved a lot of problems back then.

This past year put most people to the test. Be it destruction of a facility via fire or foreclosure or job loss, we’ve had to somehow come face to face with serious stuff. I also have to note: I didn’t hear a lot of whining from those most hard hit. One friend who lost his house stated it may have been ultimately a good thing. He found living debt-free to be a freedom he hadn’t had when house payments and repair bills held him hostage. Another friend found her job loss tto be the impetus for starting her own business, something she wanted to do for a long time. These are not just happy stories. In interviews with tsunami survivors, it was impressive that, despite the huge losses of homes and people, to be alive seemed miraculous. The bottom line of being alive was something for which to be grateful.

Bottom lines:  We finally are getting to them. Less frivolous spending of time and money. Less whining. Less yearning for an imaginary life and more appreciation of what is. More real. The ability to process the odds and ends in life and still end up feeling like its all okay, is  a process of maturation. We’re growing up and maybe just growing:  Growing more real, more spiritual, and more compassionate.

We’re a nation that likes tangibles and statistics. We quantitfy. We add up. We put a number to our net worth, our credit worthiness, and think it somehow shows us where we “fit” into this big society of ours. We even look at our Facebook count as if it might hold some useful info. (It doesn’t.) I suggest we take stock of those things  that we had all along but have no quantitative value – strength, stamina, compassion and hope.  Money and stuff comes and goes. The real deal remains. Character endures. We always knew it. But now, we really really know it. And it is priceless.

Tobi Nason is a Manzanita counselor. She can be reached at tobio@nehalemtel.net for feedback or ideas. Welcome back, Hipfish!

Categories
Calendar

April 2011 Goings On

Saturday 9


MUSIC
Musician’s Jam. Free, 2 – 4pm at the Tillamook Library.
Barney Perrine. Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6 – 9pm at the Wine Bar at Sewwt Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.
Columbia Crew. Folk. No cover, 6pm at Charlie’s Chowder House in Astoria.
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. 7pm at Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.
Kaivama Concert & Dance. Finnish-American Folk. $10 adults, $5 students. 7 – 8:30pm concert, 9 – 11pm dance w/ Scandinavian Country Band. At Soumi Hall/Finnish Brotherhood Hall in Astoria.

ART
Astoria’s Second Saturday Art Walk. 5 – 9pm downtown Astoria.
Art Opening. Patrick Carrico. Mixed media and found art works. Free, noon – 4pm at Redmen Hall in Skamokawa, WA.

FOOD & DRINK
Pancake breakfast. $5 for adults, $3 for children. 8am – 11am at the Peninsula Senior Activity Center in Klipsan Beach, WA.
Wine Tasting. Penner-Ash. 1 – 4pm at the Cellar on 10th in Astoria.
Wine Tasting Special. $9 for 4 2-oz pours + complimentary appetizers. 4 – 6pm at the Wine bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

HAPPENING
Treasure Hunters Roadshow. Appraisers from the reality TV show Treasure Hunters Roadshow will take a look at local treasures and collectibles. Free, 9am – 4pm at the Best Western Lincoln Inn in Astoria.
Historic Preservation Fair. Columbia Pacific Preservation Guild, CCC Historic Preservation Graduates, and local vendors exhibit historic preservation projects, products, and demonstrations. 9:30am – 3pm at the Ft George Brewery Lovell Building in Astoria.
Hometown Tourism Day. Several tourist destinations in Clatsop County, OR and Pacific County, WA are offering free or reduced admission fees or special programs to encourage locals to come and see what they have to offer. FMI, go to:
nps.gov/lewi/planyourvisit/foclspecial-events.htm.
NW Challenge & Recreational Sports Expo. Vendors, exhibitions, outdoor pursuits seminars, and the X-Treme Air Dog Championship compe- tition. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for children & seniors, kids under 5 & military personnel w/ ID are free. 10am – 6pm at the Exhibition Hall at Clatsop County Fairgrounds near Astoria. clatsopfairgrounds.com/nwchallenge.htm.
Birding & Blues Festival. Guided field trips, seminars & workshops, concerts, kayak & boat tours. At various locations in and around Pacific City. For a complete schedule of events, go to: birdingandblues.com.
Annual Fish Fin Clipping Day. 9am – 3pm at Whiskey Creek Fish Hatchery near Tillamook. 503-842-6519
Lower Columbia Pug Socializing Club. Pugs and their people meet for fun and socialization. 11am at Carruthers Park in Warrenton.
Farm Aid. A benefit to help stop foreclosure at Green Angel Gardens. Music, poetry, & stories of farming. Donation at the door. 6 – 9pm at Ft George in Astoria.
Spring Fling 2011. Coastal Family Health Center presents “Spring Fling 2011” (formerly your senior prom). Come enjoy a dance, desserts and bid on a silent auction. 7 – 11pm at the Banker’s Ballroom in Astoria.    503-325-8315.

LITERARY
Author Appearance. Christine Fletcher, author of books for teens, will speak at the Tillamook Library at 11am. Free. Second Saturday Northwest Authors Series.
Fantasy writer Terry Brooks, author of the popular Shanarra series will be at the Cannon Beach Library at 2pm.

THEATER
Frogtown. Musical stage show. 4 – 6pm at the Don Whitney Auditorium. After party will be held at 8pm at the Second St Public Market in Tillamook with live music by Radio Cowboy. 503-842-8432 for ticket info.
The Fantasticks. Musical. 7pm at the Peninsula Players River City Theater in Ilwaco, WA.
Southern Hospitality. Comedy. Tickets available at 503-842-7940 or at the door. 7 – 9pm at TAPA Community Playhouse in Tillamook.
Rough Crossing. Comedy. $8 – $20, 8pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Sunday 10


MUSIC
All That Jazz. Jazz. No cover (donations accepted). 2pm at the Wet Dog Café in Astoria.
The Diamond Experience. A Neil Diamond tribute band, $12 at the door, 2pm at the Raymond Theater in Raymond, WA.
David Carlson & Susie Godsey. “Great American Songbook” Concert. Americana. $10 suggested donation. 3 – 5pm at St Catherine of Alexandria Episcopal Church in Nehalem.
Vinca String Quartet. Chamber Music. 503-965- 6499 for info/tickets. 3pm at the Camp Winema Chapel in Neskowin.
Swingcats. Swing/Jazz/Blues. No cover, 6pm at Lil’ Bayou in Seaside.
Worth Trio. No cover. 8pm at Fort George Brewery & Public House in Astoria.

HAPPENING
NW Challenge & Recreational Sports Expo. Vendors, exhibitions, outdoor pursuits seminars, and the X-Treme Air Dog Championship compe- tition. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for children & seniors, kids under 5 & military personnal w/ ID are free. 11am – 5pm at the Exhibition Hall at Clatsop County Fairgrounds near Astoria. clatsopfairgrounds.com/nwchallenge.htm.
Birding & Blues Festival. Guided field trips, seminars & workshops, concerts, kayak & boat tours. At various locations in and around Pacific City. For a complete schedule of events, go to: birdingandblues.com.

LITERARY
Poetry Reading. Clemens Starck, author of “China Basin” and “Studying Russian on Company Time” will be at the Driftwood Public Library in Lincoln City at 3pm.

THEATER
The Fantasticks. Musical. 2pm at the Peninsula Players River City Theater in Ilwaco, WA.
Southern Hospitality. Comedy. Tickets avail- able at 503-842-7940 or at the door. 7 – 9pm at TAPA Community Playhouse in Tillamook.
Rough Crossing. Comedy. $8 – $20, 3pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Monday 11


MUSIC
Burgers & Jam. Burger night with a live music jam session. No cover, burgers are $6. 6pm at the American Legion Hall in Cannon Beach.
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. No cover, 6:30 at A Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.

Tuesday 12


MUSIC
Brian O’Connor. Acoustic & Jazz guitar. No cover, 6pm at the Shelburne Pub in Seaview, WA
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. 6:30pm at Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.
Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6:30pm at the Harbor Bite in Seaside.

FOOD & DRINK
Kiwanis Pancake Feed. Tickets available at the door. 5pm – 7pm at the Seaside Civic & Convention Center.

LECTURE
Life in Iraq Series. Joel Preston Smith – “Night of a Thousand Stars: A Portrait of Life in Iraq.” A discussion/conversation with slides. Free, 6:30pm at the Driftwood Public Library in Lincoln City.
Adventure in History Lecture Series III. “The Astor Party & the Founding of Astoria” with Storyteller Rex Ziak. Plus dessert buffet, no-host bar, & music by the Brownsmead Flats. $15 for adults, $13 for S/S & Military. 7pm at the McTavish Room of the Liberty Theater in Astoria.

Wednesday 13


MUSIC
Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at the Rio Café in Astoria.
Open Mic Night. 7 – 9pm at Lush Wine Bar in Cannon Beach.

HAPPENING
The Twelve Days of Earth Day. A series of environmentally-themed events held in Cannon Beach. Schedule at: cannonbeach.org, under What To Do and Events.
North Coast Job & Career Fair. Open to job seekers and students seeking career information. This annual event showcases over 60 employment recruiters, colleges, and educational organizations. 12:30 – 4pm at the Seaside Civic & Convention Center.
Team Trivia Tournament. Answer the most questions correctly & win prizes & bragging rights. 6pm at the Seaside Public Library.
Ecstatic Dance. Spirit-filled, freestyle, yogic trance dance. $5 – $7, 6:30 – 7:45pm, at Pine Grove Community House in Manzanita

LECTURE
Scandinavian Immigration to the Northwest. Author Lars Nordstrom will be discussing his new book Ten New Lives: Swedes in the Pacific Northwest, a collection of oral histories of post-Vietnam War Swedish immigrants to the Pacific Northwest. 7:30pm at the Cannon Beach History Center.

LITERARY
Open Mic Poetry Reading. Free, 7pm in the Reading Room at the Driftwood Public Library in Lincoln City.

Thursday 14


MUSIC
Richard T. Jazz/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at Lil’ Bayou in Seaside.
Jim Wilkins. 7pm at the Voodoo Room in Astoria.
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. 6:30pm at Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.
Jam Session. No cover, 7pm at the Triangle Tavern in Astoria.
Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 9pm at Sam’s Seaside Café in Seaside.

HAPPENING
The Twelve Days of Earth Day. A series of environmentally-themed events held in Cannon Beach. Schedule at: cannonbeach.org, under What To Do and Events.
Knitting/Spinning Group. 3 – 5pm at the Astoria Fiber Arts Academy.
Poetry Open Mike. No cover, 8:30pm at the Wine Bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

LITERARY
Author Event. Jack de Yonge, author of “Boom Town Boy” will be at the Seaside Library at 7pm.

THEATER
The Real Lewis & Clark Story. Or How the Finns Discovered Astoria. Musical melodrama. $8 – $15, 7:30pm at the ASOC Playhouse in Astoria.
Rough Crossing. Comedy. $8 – $20, 7:30pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Friday 15


MUSIC
Bill Hayes. Rock/Folk/Bluegrass. No cover, 5 – 8pm at the Cannon Beach Cookie Company.
Tom Trudell. Jazz piano. No cover, 6– 9pm at Clemente’s in Astoria.
Asleep at the Switch. Blues, Country, 40’s, & 50’s. Free (donations accepted), 6 – 8pm at the City Hall in Garibaldi.
Richard T. Jazz/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. 7pm at Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.
Paleface. Folk/Indie/Rock. No cover, 7pm at McMenamins Sand Trap in Gearhart.
Smile Brigade. Big Beat/Psychedelic/Show Tunes. No cover, 8pm at Hazel’s Tavern in Astoria.
Kathryn Claire CD Release Concert. With Chris Hayes. $5, 8:30pm at the VooDoo Room in Astoria.

ART
Tolovana Arts Colony Art Show. 10am – 4pm at Tolovana Hall in Cannon Beach.

CINEMA
A Night to Remember. $5, 7pm at the Liberty Theater in Astoria.

HAPPENING
The Twelve Days of Earth Day. A series of environmentally-themed events held in Cannon Beach. Schedule at: cannonbeach.org, under What To Do and Events.

LECTURE
“Into the Depths of the Cape Falcon Marine Reserve”. With Nadia Gardner. 7 – 9pm at the Cannon Beach Chamber of Commerce.

THEATER
Southern Hospitality. Comedy. Tickets avail- able at 503-842-7940 or at the door. 7 – 9pm at TAPA Community Playhouse in Tillamook.
The Real Lewis & Clark Story. Or How the Finns Discovered Astoria. Musical melodrama. $8 – $15, 7:30pm at the ASOC Playhouse in Astoria.
Rough Crossing. Comedy. $8 – $20, 8pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Saturday 16


MUSIC
Musician’s Jam. Free, 2 – 4pm at the Tillamook Library.
Mary Flower. Ragtime/Blues/Folk. No cover, 6 – 9pm at the Wine Bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.
Kathryn Claire CD Release Concert. $5, 7pm at the Old Long Beach Train Depot in Long Beach, WA
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. 7pm at Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.
Zugh. $5 cover, 9pm at the San Dune Pub in Manzanita.

ART
Tokeland/Northcove Studio Tour. Showcasing the diverse talents of fifteen artists, working in a variety of media. Free, 10am – 5pm. Pick up a map of locations at the Tokeland Hotel in Tokeland, WA.
Artist Trunk Show. Featuring local artists to meet and greet. Drawings, painting, jewelry, and more. 10am – 5pm at Long Beach Coffee Roasters in Long Beach, WA 360-642-2334.
Tolovana Arts Colony Art Show. 10am – 4pm at Tolovana Hall in Cannon Beach.

FOOD & DRINK
The Moose is Loose Chili Cook-Off. $5 includes chili sampling. 12:30 – 3pm at the Moose Lodge in Astoria.
Celebrity Spaghetti Cook-Off. Adults $12, children $6, 5pm at Swiss Hall in Tillamook. 503- 842-2539, ext 13
Wine Tasting. Oregon Pinot Noir. 1 – 4pm at the Cellar on 10th in Astoria.
Wine Tasting Special. $9 for 4 2-oz pours + complimentary appetizers. 4 – 6pm at the Wine bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

HAPPENING
The Twelve Days of Earth Day. A series of environmentally-themed events held in Cannon Beach. Schedule at: cannonbeach.org, under What To Do and Events.
Shred-It Event. Dispose of documents at the SHRED-IT truck. Suggested $5 donation per “banker box” or large trash bag of documents. 10am – 1pm outside of the Astoria branch of Clatsop Community Bank.
United Paws/TAS Adoptathon. Cats and dogs are available for adoption from noon – 3pm at the 4-H Dorm at the Tillamook County Fairgrounds in Tillamook. To adopt anytime, call 503-842-5663 or unitedpaws.org.

LECTURE
Coastal Gardening Seminar. With Clatsop County Master Gardeners. At the Clatsop County Fairgrounds, Astoria. FMI, call 503-325-8573

LITERARY
Presentation. Photojournalist and environmental activist Gary Braasch, author of “Earth Under Fire: How Global Warming is Changing the World” will speak at 7pm at the Cannon Beach Chamber of Commerce Hall.
Manzanita Writer’s Series. Author Jane Kirkpatrick will read from her latest novel “A Daughter’s Walk. Q&A and Open Mic follows. $5, 7pm at the Hoffman Center in Manzanita.

THEATER
Southern Hospitality. Comedy. Tickets avail- able at 503-842-7940 or at the door. 7 – 9pm at TAPA Community Playhouse in Tillamook.
The Real Lewis & Clark Story. Or How the Finns Discovered Astoria. Musical melodrama. $8 – $15, 7:30pm at the ASOC Playhouse in Astoria.
Rough Crossing. Comedy. $8 – $20, 8pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Sunday 17


MUSIC
All That Jazz. Jazz. No cover (donations ac- cepted). 2pm at the Wet Dog Café in Astoria.
Swingcats. Swing/Jazz/Blues. No cover, 6pm at Lil’ Bayou in Seaside.
The Quick & Easy Boys. Funk/Psychedelic Rock/ Garage Soul. No cover. 8pm at Fort George Brewery & Public House in Astoria.

ART
Artist Trunk Show. Featuring local artists to meet and greet. Drawings, painting, jewelry, and more. 10am – 5pm at Long Beach Coffee Roasters in Long Beach, WA 360-642-2334.

FOOD & DRINK
Pancake Breakfast. All-you-can-eat for $5, 8am – noon at the Bay City Arts Center.
Cannon Beach American Legion breakfast. $7 adults, $3 children under 6. 9 – 11:30am at the American Legion Hall in Cannon Beach.

HAPPENING
Astoria’s Downtown Proud Clean-up Event. In downtown Astoria. 503-791-7940.
Spring Community Clean-up. Residential trash will be accepted at no charge (certain restrictions apply) at the Astoria Transfer Station. Participants must reside within the Astoria city limits and be WOW customers. 8am – 4pm.
The Twelve Days of Earth Day. A series of environmentally-themed events held in Cannon Beach. Schedule at: cannonbeach.org, under What To Do and Events.

LECTURE
In Their Footsteps Lecture Series. “The Daughter’s Walk: A Northwest Story of 1896 and Beyond” with Jane Kirkpatrick. Park fees apply, 1pm at the Netul room in the Visitor’s Center at Fort Clatsop.

THEATER
The Real Lewis & Clark Story. Or How the Finns Discovered Astoria. Musical melodrama. $8 – $15, 2pm at the ASOC Playhouse in Astoria.

Monday 18


MUSIC
Burgers & Jam. Burger night with a live music jam session. No cover, burgers are $6. 6pm at the American Legion Hall in Cannon Beach.
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. No cover, 6:30 at A Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.

FOOD & DRINK
Ice Cream Social. The public is invited for cake & ice cream + birthday celebration. $1 sug- gested donation, free if it’s your birthday month. 2pm at the Peninsula Senior Activity Center in Klipsan Beach, WA

HAPPENING
The Twelve Days of Earth Day. A series of environmentally-themed events held in Cannon Beach. Schedule at: cannonbeach.org, under What To Do and Events.

Tuesday 19


MUSIC
Brian O’Connor. Acoustic & Jazz guitar. No cover, 6pm at the Shelburne Pub in Seaview, WA
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. 6:30pm at Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.
Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6:30pm at the Harbor Bite in Seaside.

Wednesday 20


MUSIC
Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at the Rio Café in Astoria.
Open Mic Night. All acts welcome. 5 – 7pm at the Three Cups Coffee House in Astoria.
Open Mic Night. Hosted by Ann Tierney. All levels welcome. 5 – 7pm at Wheelhouse Coffee Company in Astoria.
Open Mic Night. 7 – 9pm at Lush Wine Bar in Cannon Beach.

CINEMA
Politics of Sand. A documentary chronicling the efforts to keep Oregon’s beaches public. 7pm at the Cannon Beach Chamber of Commerce Hall.

HAPPENING
The Twelve Days of Earth Day. A series of environmentally-themed events held in Cannon Beach. Schedule at: cannonbeach.org, under What To Do and Events.
Ecstatic Dance. Spirit-filled, freestyle, yogic trance dance. $5 – $7, 6:30 – 7:45pm, at Pine Grove Community House in Manzanita.

LITERARY
Cannon Beach Reads. This month’s book is “Their Eyes Were Watching God” by Zora Neale Hurston. The discussion is free and open to the public. 7pm at the Cannon Beach Library.

Thursday 21


MUSIC
Richard T. Jazz/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at Lil’ Bayou in Seaside.
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. 6:30pm at Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.
Jam Session. No cover, 7pm at the Triangle Tavern in Astoria.
Jim Wilkins. 7pm at the Voodoo Room in Astoria.
Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 9pm at Sam’s Seaside Café in Seaside.

HAPPENING
The Twelve Days of Earth Day. A series of environmentally-themed events held in Cannon Beach. Schedule at: cannonbeach.org, under What To Do and Events.
Knitting/Spinning Group. 3 – 5pm at the Astoria Fiber Arts Academy.

LITERARY
Oregon Poet Laureate. Poet Laureate Paulann Petersen will present a poetry reading & discussion. Free, 7pm at the Seaside Library.
Poetry Open Mike. No cover, 8:30pm at the Wine Bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

THEATER
The Real Lewis & Clark Story. Or How the Finns Discovered Astoria. Musical melodrama. $8 – $15, 7:30pm at the ASOC Playhouse in Astoria.

Friday 22


MUSIC
Bill Hayes. Rock/Folk/Bluegrass. No cover, 5 – 8pm at the Cannon Beach Cookie Company.
Tom Trudell. Jazz piano. No cover, 6 – 9pm at Clemente’s in Astoria.
Asleep at the Switch. Blues, Country, 40’s, & 50’s. Free (donations accepted), 6 – 8pm at the City Hall in Garibaldi.
Richard T. Jazz/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.
Billy D & The Hoodoos. Blues-based Rock. No cover, 7pm at McMenamins Sand Trap in Gearhart.
Country Music Jam. Free, 7 – 9pm at the Wickiup Senior Center in Svensen.
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, Bossa nova. 7pm at Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.

HAPPENING
The Twelve Days of Earth Day. A series of environmentally-themed events held in Cannon Beach. Schedule at: cannonbeach.org, under What To Do and Events.

LITERARY
Oregon Poet Laureate. Poet Laureate Paulann Petersen will present a poetry reading & discussion. Free, 7pm at the Astoria Library.

THEATER
The Real Lewis & Clark Story. Or How the Finns Discovered Astoria. Musical melodrama. $8 – $15, 7:30pm at the ASOC Playhouse in Astoria.
Rough Crossing. Comedy. $8 – $20, 8pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Saturday 23


MUSIC
Troll Radio Revue. Americana. Free for children, $2 for adults. At the PAC in Astoria.
Musician’s Jam. Free, 2 – 4pm at the Tillamook Library.
David Mullaney. Acoustic Blues. No cover, 6 – 9pm at the Wine Bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. 7pm at Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.

FOOD & DRINK
Wine Tasting. Wines for Easter. 1 – 4pm at the Cellar on 10th in Astoria.
Wine Tasting Special. $9 for 4 2-oz pours + complimentary appetizers. 4 – 6pm at the Wine bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

HAPPENING
The Twelve Days of Earth Day. A series of environmentally-themed events held in Cannon Beach. Schedule at: cannonbeach.org, under What To Do and Events.
Easter Egg Hunt. At Rockaway City Park, call 503-355-2291 for time.
Easter Egg Hunt. 10 – 11am at Nestucca Union High School field in Rockaway Beach. 503-965-6000
Easter Egg Hunt. For children preschool through 4th grade. 10am at Nestucca Valley High School in Cloverdale.
Easter Bonnet Contest & Easter Egg Hunt. 10:30 &11am at Underhill Plaza in Manzanita.
Elks Easter Egg Hunt. Noon at the Tillamook Elks Picnic Grounds in Tillamook. 503-842-6623.
Fire Mountain School Raffle Party. Raffle (prizes include a trip for 2 to Jamacia), live music by Ma Barley, and Jamacian Cuisine. $40 raffle ticket includes admission for 2, $10 per person for party only. 6pm at the Nehalem Fire Hall.

LECTURE
Guest Speaker Series. With author Bonnie Henderson. 1pm at the Tillamook County Pioneer Museum in Tillamook. 503-842-4553.

LITERARY
Writers on the Edge. Oregon’s Poet Laureate, Paulann Petersen will read from her recent books, which include “The Voluptuary” and “Kindle. ” Q&A and open mic sessions follow. $6, 7pm at the Newport Visual Arts Center in Newport.

OUTSIDE
Beach Clean-Up. Help clean up the 28 miles of beach on the Long Beach Peninsula. 9:30am – 12:30pm at any major beach approach on the Long Beach Peninsula, WA.

THEATER
The Real Lewis & Clark Story. Or How the Finns Discovered Astoria. Musical melodrama. $8 – $15, 7:30pm at the ASOC Playhouse in Astoria.
Rough Crossing. Comedy. $8 – $20, 8pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Sunday 24


MUSIC
Country-Folk Music Jam. Americana. Bring your instruments and take part. 1pm at the Tillamook Forest Center, on Hwy 6, east of Tillamook.
All That Jazz. Jazz. No cover (donations accepted). 2pm at the Wet Dog Café in Astoria.
Swingcats. Swing/Jazz/Blues. No cover, 6pm at Lil’ Bayou in Seaside.
Class M Planets. Experimental/Folk/Pop. With guests The Envelope Peasant. No cover. 8pm at Fort George Brewery & Public House in Astoria.

HAPPENING
The Twelve Days of Earth Day. A series of environmentally-themed events held in Cannon Beach. Schedule at: cannonbeach.org, under What To Do and Events.
PNPW Pro Wrestling. $10, 5pm at the Astoria Event Center.

Monday 25


MUSIC
Burgers & Jam. Burger night with a live music jam session. No cover, burgers are $6. 6pm at the American Legion Hall in Cannon Beach.
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. No cover, 6:30 at A Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.

Tuesday 26


MUSIC
Brian O’Connor. Acoustic & Jazz guitar. No cover, 6pm at the Shelburne Pub in Seaview, WA.
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. 6:30pm at Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.
Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6:30pm at the Harbor Bite in Seaside.

Wednesday 27


MUSIC
Open Mic. All Acts are welcome. No cover, 5 – 7pm at the Three Cups Coffeehouse in Astoria.
Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6 pm at the Rio Café in Astoria.
Open Mic. No cover, 7 – 9pm at Lush Wine Bar in Cannon Beach.

HAPPENING
Soup Bowl Event. Benefit for the Astoria Women’s Resource Center. $30 for soup in handmade bowl, $15 for no bowl. 6 – 8pm at the Seaside Civic & Convention Center.
Tsunami Awareness Town Hall Meeting. The program will include two short films and a panel of speakers. 6 – 10pm at the Liberty Theater in Astoria.
Ecstatic Dance. Spirit-filled, freestyle, yogic trance dance. $5 – $7, 6:30 – 7:45pm, at Pine Grove Community House in Manzanita.

LITERARY
Local Author Showcase. Writers and friends are invited to come share and listen to original works being read by local authors. Free, 6 – 8pm at Olde Towne Trading Post in Ilwaco, WA.

THEATER
The Sound of Music. Musical. The daytime performance is preceeded by a fundraising luncheon at 10:15, call ahead to reserve a seat: 503-392-3194 x 511. $8 for performance only, s/s $6. 11am at Nestucca High School in Cloverdale.

Thursday 28


MUSIC
Richard T. Jazz/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at Lil’ Bayou in Seaside.
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. 6:30pm at Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.
Jam Session. No cover, 7pm at the Triangle Tavern in Astoria.
Jim Wilkins. 7pm at the Voodoo Room in Astoria.
Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 9pm at Sam’s Seaside Café in Seaside.

FOOD & DRINK
Fundraising Dinner. $7 for adults and $5 for children includes. 5 – 6:30pm at the Peninsula Senior Activity Center in Klipsan Beach, WA. (3rd Thurs)

HAPPENING
Knitting/Spinning Group. 3 – 5pm at the Astoria Fiber Arts Academy.
Poetry Open Mike. No cover, 8:30pm at the Wine Bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

OUTSIDE
Sand Trap Golf Tourney. 4 person shamble, shotgun start, 21 and over. $180 per team, $240 per team with carts. Reservations
required at: www.mcmenamins.com/events/87463-Sand-Trap-Golf-Tourney or call 503-717-8150. Check in starts at noon, tourney starts at 1pm. At McMenamins Sand Trap in Gearhart.

THEATER
The Real Lewis & Clark Story. Or How the Finns Discovered Astoria. Musical melodrama. $8 – $15, 7:30pm at the ASOC Playhouse in Astoria.

Friday 29


MUSIC
Bill Hayes. Rock/Folk/Bluegrass. No cover, 5 – 8pm at the Cannon Beach Cookie Company.
Tom Trudell. Jazz piano. No cover, 6 – 9pm at Clemente’s in Astoria.
Asleep at the Switch. Blues, Country, 40’s, & 50’s. Free (donations accepted), 6 – 8pm at the City Hall in Garibaldi.
Richard T. Jazz/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. 7pm at Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.
Eric John Kaiser. Acoustic/Classic Rock/Pop. No cover, 7pm at McMenamins Sand Trap in Gearhart.

ART
Spring Unveiling Art Festival. All day events: demonstrations, featured artists, and more. At various locations in Cannon Beach. For schedule, go to: cbgallerygroup.com/old-docs/mainspring2011.htm.

HAPPENING
Crab, Seafood & Wine Festival. Coastal cuisine, arts & crafts, wine tasting, live music, and more. $8 admission, 4 – 9pm at the Clatsop County Fairgrounds near Astoria. For schedule, go to: www.oldoregon.com/events/entry/astoriawarrenton-crab-seafood-wine-festival/.

THEATER
The Real Lewis & Clark Story. Or How the Finns Discovered Astoria. Musical melodrama. $8 – $15, 7:30pm at the ASOC Playhouse in Astoria.

Saturday 30


MUSIC
Troll Radio Revue. Americana. $2 for adults, free for children. 11am – noon at the PAC in Astoria.
Musician’s Jam. Free, 2 – 4pm at the Tillamook Library.
Thomasian Trio. Many music styles from the 20’s to the 80’s. No cover, 6 – 9pm at the Wine bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. 7pm at Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.
Stump Town Winds. “Woodwind Quintet Concert.” 7:30pm at the PAC in Astoria.

ART
Spring Unveiling Art Festival. All day events: demonstrations, featured artists, and more. At various locations in Cannon Beach. For schedule, go to: cbgallerygroup.com/old-docs/mainspring2011.htm.

FOOD & DRINK
Wine Tasting. Crab Festival Surprise. 1 – 4pm at the Cellar on 10th in Astoria.
Wine Tasting Special. $9 for 4 2-oz pours + complimentary appetizers. 4 – 6pm at the Wine bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.
Winemaker’s Dinner. Troon. Reservations required, 503-325-6600. 6pm at the Cellar on 10th in Astoria.
Fish Taco Cookoff. Chefs from throughout Oregon will compete to take home the title: Best Fish Taco. Free admission at the door with small tacos available for $1 each. FMI 541-996-1274. 11am – 2pm at the Culinary Center in Lincoln City.

HAPPENING
Loyalty Day Events. All-day events at variouslocations on the Long Beach Peninsula, WA. http://loyaltydayslongbeach.com/saturday/.
Crab, Seafood & Wine Festival. Coastal cuisine, arts & crafts, wine tasting, live music, and more. $10 admission, 10am – 8pm at the
Clatsop County Fairgrounds near Astoria. For schedule, go to: oldoregon.com/events/entry/astoria-warrenton-crab-seafood-wine-festival/.
50’s Cruise Reunion. Car Show, games,vendors, 50’s music and more. $15 registration, $2 spectator fee. 9am – 4pm at Camp Rilea in Warrenton. beachbarons.com/html/50_s_cruise_reunion_.html.

LECTURE
Growing Edibles on the North Coast. With local organic farmer Teresa Retzlaff. Free, 1pm at the Seaside Library.

OUTSIDE
Black Lake Fishing Derby. Free. 7am registration, 10am last fish weigh-in, 10:30am awards & prizes. At Black Lake in Ilwaco, WA.

THEATER
The Real Lewis & Clark Story. Or How the Finns Discovered Astoria. Musical melodrama. $8 – $15, 7:30pm at the ASOC Playhouse in Astoria.
The Sound of Music. Musical. The evening performance will feature a fundraising dinners at 5:30 hosted by the band dept. parents, call ahead to reserve a seat: 503-392-3194 x 511. $8 for performance only, s/s $6. 7:30pm, at Nestucca High School in Cloverdale.

Sunday 1


MUSIC
Bluegrass Music Jam. 1 – 3pm at the Tillamook Forest Center.
All That Jazz. Jazz. No cover (donations accepted). 2pm at the Wet Dog Café in Astoria.
Gould Piano Trio with Robert Plane, Clarinet. Chamber music. 3 – 5pm at the Chapel at Camp Winema in Neskowin. 503-965-6499 for information/tickets.
Astoria Chamber Players. “Menu for Four Players.” 4pm at the PAC in Astoria.
Swingcats. Swing/Jazz/Blues. No cover, 6pm at Lil’ Bayou in Seaside.
Kathryn Claire. Acoustic/Folk/Indie. No cover. 8pm at Fort George Brewery & Public House in Astoria.

ART
Spring Unveiling Art Festival. All day events: demonstrations, featured artists, and more. At various locations in Cannon Beach. For schedule, go to: cbgallerygroup.com/old-docs/mainspring2011.htm.

HAPPENING
Loyalty Day Events. All-day events at various locations on the Long Beach Peninsula, WA. http://loyaltydayslongbeach.com/sunday/.
Crab, Seafood & Wine Festival. Coastal cuisine, arts & crafts, wine tasting, live music, and more. $5 admission, 11am – 4pm at the Clatsop County Fairgrounds near Astoria. For schedule, go to: oldoregon.com/events/entry/astoria-warrenton-crab-seafood-wine-festival/.
PNPW Pro Wrestling. $10, 5 – 8pm at the Astoria Event Center.

Monday 2


MUSIC
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. No cover, 6:30 at A Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.

Tuesday 3


MUSIC
Brian O’Connor. Acoustic & Jazz guitar. No cover, 6pm at the Shelburne Pub in Seaview, WA.
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. 6:30pm at Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.
Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6:30pm at the Harbor Bite in Seaside.

HAPPENING
Nautical Renaissance. All day events as tall ships Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain visit Ilwaco. For schedule, go to funbeach.com and click on Calendars, then Nautical Renaissance.
Tsunami Rally. With guest speaker Geologist James Roddey. Learn about survival tools, plans, and more. 7pm at the Kiawanda Community Center in Pacific City.

Wednesday 4


MUSIC
Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at the Rio Café in Astoria.
Baga’s Front Room. Join other music lovers every first Wednesday for song and conversation and maybe to sip a little wine or other beverage. Food available too. 7pm at Lush Wine Bar in Cannon Beach.

HAPPENING
Ecstatic Dance. Spirit-filled, freestyle, yogic trance dance. $5 – $7, 6:30 – 7:45pm, at Pine Grove Community House in Manzanita.

Thursday 5


MUSIC
Richard T. Jazz/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at Lil’ Bayou in Seaside.
Dan Golden. Guitar: Jazz, tango, bossa nova. 6:30pm at Taste of Tuscany in Seaside.
Jam Session. No cover, 7pm at the Triangle Tavern in Astoria.
Jim Wilkins. 7pm at the Voodoo Room in Astoria.
Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 9pm at Sam’s Seaside Café in Seaside.

HAPPENING
Knitting/Spinning Group. 3 – 5pm at the Astoria Fiber Arts Academy.
Poetry Open Mike. No cover, 8:30pm at the Wine Bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

Categories
FEATURES

No. 10 Tenants Talk to HIPFiSH

Burnt No. 10
Constance Waisanen had been doing investment and retirement planning
for the Astoria branch of Thrivent Financial for Lutherans at #10 6th St since 2006. A month and a half before the fire, Matt Crichton was hired on at Thrivent. Waisanen and Crichton miss the “funky historical flavor and the feeling of camaraderie,” that existed at #10 6th St. “There was a sense of family between the tenants,” says Waisanen, who first learned of the fire via Facebook.

“I was just getting ready to go to bed and I clicked on Facebook . A friend’s son had just posted an entry saying that the Cannery Café was on fire and so I posted back,‘Tell me more, my office is next door!’ His mother was with him and she immediately called me. While we were talking she said she could see smoke coming out of our building.”

Crichton, who lives on the south slope of Astoria received a call from a friend around midnight. “She had to tell me it was on fire five times because it didn’t seem real,” he said. “Coming over the hill, I saw a bright yellow-orange ball of fire. I didn’t like that and I actually turned off and parked just to watch it from afar before I went down to the scene.”

Nearly everything in the Thrivent office was destroyed. However, all of the company’s files had been backed up to an offsite single server. Waisanen says that she was lucky and had taken her work computer home with her, but “Even if I hadn’t, I would have been able to call the company and they would have overnighted me a computer with all of my files on it. When you work in the financial world you really need to have that kind of security.”

Still, not much was left for them to recover. “I had a nativity set that my mother had bought me in Mexico. I found all the figures from it except for baby Jesus.”

“And we looked and looked and looked for baby Jesus,” adds Crichton.

“We dug through the ashes pretty deep, but we didn’t find him. ‘He has risen,’ went through my mind,” said Waisanen with a grin.
Unfortunately, the fire destroyed Waisanen’s own beautiful art quilts which hung on the office walls. “Virtually everyone’s first response was: ‘Your quilts are gone,’ because that’s what they remember from being in my office.”

Crichton, who had recently returned from a stint in the Peace Corps, lost souvenirs from Samoa, where he taught High School. “I lost my hardwood, hand carved ‘ava’ bowl and my souve- nir war clubs! But that just gives me an excuse to go back to Samoa,” he said.

Both Waisanen and Crichton were touched by the outpouring of condolences from the community at large as well as customers and colleagues who called to the company’s national headquarters from Longview and Tillamook. “Be- cause we are a faith-based company there was a lot of prayer going out for us,” said Waisanen.

For two months after the fire, Thrivent operated in space lent to them by the congregation at First Lutheran Church in Astoria. They have since relocated to The Red Building at 20 Basin St. Several other financial offices displaced by the fire have also resettled there, “it’s a financial Mecca now,” quips Waisanen who thinks that the new office is a far better fit for their needs. The Thrivent office was at the point of needing to expand, and the fire proved to be the impetus to make the jump.

“It wasn’t bad timing, it just wasn’t the best way to do it,” said Waisanen. “At least we didn’t have to move any furniture! It feels good to have a firm base of operations now and it’s nice to have the sound of the water lapping underneath us again.”

Constance Waisanen is the Financial Consultant for the Astoria branch of Thrivent.
Matt Crichton is a Financial Associate at Thrivent.


With more than 30 employees at their #10 6th Street location, Clatsop Behavioral Health (CBH) was the largest tenant of the building, occupying much of the first floor. Staff member Sumuer Watkins had worked in #10 since CBH moved there in 1997. “When you’ve been in a place for that many years, it feels like home.” She fondly recalls staff potlucks in the conference room, counting sea lions in the Columbia River as she walked down the windowed hallway, and visits from Charlie the seagull who would rap on the window when he wanted food.

June Longway misses her office in #10 6th Street. “I had a wonderful view, right on the water, looking across at the mountains in Washington.” She loved the convenience and friendliness of the Lazy Spoon Café and being able to easily consult with other therapists who worked in the historic building.

Everything changed on December 16 when fire broke out in the Cannery Café. Late that night, Watkins was woken by a call from her brother who is a volunteer with the Warrenton Fire Department. By the time she and her husband had arrived at the fire, #10 6th Street was burning.

Watkins is grateful for the actions of emergency workers at the scene. “The police and fire personnel were so amazing. They came and found us, told us they had pulled some of our items out of the building, helped us load it into the back of my husband’s truck. I was so impressed with them because they were actually trying to save what they could of ours, knowing that it was very important and that it was confidential information. They kept watch on everything, policemen were guarding it until we got there.”

Unfortunately, they were able to remove only a fraction of the records from CBH before it became too dangerous to enter the building. Most client records were stored in a file room, which was windowless and locked. Later it was found that the paper records in the file room had not burned and were salvageable.

In the immediate aftermath of the fire, CBH set up a temporary workspace in their Open Door location, just around the corner from #10. They contacted all clients within 48 hours of the fire and were able to start seeing patients again within a week. Just after Christmas, CBH moved into four separate suites in the Park Medical Building in Astoria. According to Watkins, it was a scramble, ordering enough computers, furniture, and office supplies for 30 staff members. “It was $250 for staplers; it was crazy, the amount of office supplies we needed. Essentially, we were working off of TV trays and card tables. It took about a month for us to feel like an office again.”

Andrew Art
Andrew Wiegardt ressurects Darren Orange painting, Resurrection Hipfish

Getting used to the new workspace has been an adjustment for CBH staff members. Finding space for 30 individual offices under one roof was nearly impossible in a necessarily short time-frame. Moving into four different suites scattered throughout the Park Building was a compromise. Both Watkins and Longway say that they feel more isolated in the new space, that there is some disconnect between employees who had felt like family before the fire. There are actually more group rooms available than at #10 6th Street, but none is large enough to comfortably hold the entire CBH staff.

 

There are, however, advantages in having four separate waiting areas. Longway says, “It’s a little calmer because there’s not as many people in one waiting room. Children are separate from adults, and the Drug and Alcohol patients have more privacy in their own space. The receptionists are more relaxed because they aren’t dealing with multiple groups plus individual clients simultaneously.”

The fire has been a springboard for positive changes in the operations of CBH.

Prior to the fire, the agency was just beginning the transition from paper to electronic medical records. Fortunately some of the earliest files to be converted contained client demographic information, which enabled the immediate recovery (from a remote server) of client contacts and caseloads. “We are fully computerized now,” says Longway. “The prescribers were already us- ing Infoscribe, so we had all the information on everybody’s medications. We made sure nobody ran out. It could have been much worse.”The forcibly accelerated switch to electronic records has been difficult for CBH staff, but is already paying off in easier accessibility. (Consider the difference between manually flipping through a handwritten paper file that you first have to physically remove from a filing system or using search parameters on an electronic database to extract certain information.) The new electronic medical records are fireproof. All records are backed up on a server in New York City.

In the long run, the devastating #10 6th Street fire may be the catalyst for many positive changes in the lives of former building tenants. Emotions and memories, however, run deep. Lives have been changed forever.

“Fire is devastating.” – June Longway
“It was very strange when I got home from the fire. I looked around at everything and thought: if I lost this, how would I feel? I now look at everything like this. It gives you a new perspec- tive, it makes you appreciate what you have, but you also know that you can get by without It.” – Sumuer Watkins

Sumuer Watkins is the Chief Operations Officer for Clatsop Behavioral Health
June Longway, P.M.H.N.P., B.C. is the Medical Director for Clatsop Behavioral Health.


Gretchen Mather, the self-employed owner/ operator of a small accounting business, was a tenant at #10 6th Street for four years before the fire, but she had moved to a new office within the building six months earlier. “I had just put my sign on the door.”

When #10 burned two weeks before the start of tax season, Mather didn’t have time to look for a new office. She immediately set up operations at her home and began working. “I did all my payroll not knowing whether I had files or not. I did my quarterlies and recreated all that data or I had my clients recreate the information for me because I didn’t know what, if anything, would be left in the building.”

During the, the roof of #10 collapsed directly into Mather’s office. Firemen postulated that her filing cabinets were gone and had probably evaporated from intense heat. When she was finally able to get into her ruined office weeks later, she could see the cabinets trapped under debris from the fallen roof. Remarkably, with the help of a friend, Mather was able to lift chunks of the roof off of her file cabinets and was able to recover 90% of her records from what was the most devastated part of the building. Unfortu- nately by that time, she had already been forced to duplicate a lot of that information.

Miraculously, Mather discovered that she had papers sitting on top of her filing cabinets that weren’t even burned. However, all of her personal photographs including artwork by her deceased aunt, Alaskan artist Barbara Stanbaugh, were destroyed. By the time Mather was able to get in to her office six weeks after the fire, the hard drive on her office computer was ruined. She had backed up her files online, only to discover after the fire that data from certain accounting software she uses is considered proprietary and was not saved after all. To say the least, this was a frustrating experience for her. Like many of the former tenants of #10, Mather feels that if she had been let in earlier, more of her belongings may have been retrievable. “Had I had access early on, I probably would have my hard drive because sitting exposed to the weather for so long is what did it in.”

All of Mather’s rescued paper files are infused with toxic smoke pollution. This has made using at the files she did rescue treacherous. “I made myself sick trying to go through the files looking for stuff. I had to wear gloves and a mask to be able to touch them because I got very ill. So did the people who tore the computers apart.”

Still, Mather says, when it comes to her business, she’s trying to think of the positive and not the negative. “How can I make it better? Why put it back the way it was? Paperless is probably the way I’m going to go.” Of the difficulties, she says, “you overcome because you have a self-employed mentality. When you are an employee, there are other people to handle the situation.”

After a particularly grueling return wasn’t going right, Mather hit a wall. “It was 9 o clock at night and I started bawling and my daughter came in and saw me and said; ‘Mom you just have to stop that and you have to keep going,’ I think my kids will take away from this experience the lesson that you can get through anything.”

Last year, Mather’s father also lost his home to a fire. “I had just gotten all of his bank records and we had put them all in my office and then my office burnt down so I had to go back to the bank again and ask them for his records all over and they were like, ‘You have to be joking!’ ”

Mather says that the fire has helped to draw herself and her father closer together. “Silly things happen, like you turn around and don’t have a paperclip or that stupid stamp. I recognized that this was exactly what my father went through.

Gretchen B. Mather, C.P.A. is sole proprietor of an accounting business.


Pam Christensen, a psychotherapist in private practice, had been working in #10 6th Street for about a year and a half before the
fire. She misses the daily interaction she had with other therapists in the building. “I really enjoyed running into colleagues in the hall. I especially enjoyed times when Dr. Daryl Birney would come sit in my office and we’d just talk,” she said.

On the night of the fire, Christensen recalled; “I was sleeping when the phone rang and didn’t recognize the number so I didn’t pick up,” on the other end was a colleague, who thankfully left a message telling her that #10 was on fire. At that point, the flames were still far from Christensen’s office. She listened to the voice mail and tried to go back to sleep.

“It really didn’t register,” she says, but it worked on her mind enough that sleep became impossible. She got up and drove to #10. “I never had seen a fire that big.”

Pam C
Pam Christensen, Counselor, hauls out client files

She called a friend who worked at Clatsop Behavioral Healthcare and the two met up at the scene.

“I think that helped me, we sat together and watched it burn from about three in the morning until about nine so we had a lot of time to talk, and process, and plan and strategize. We’d drive around and then we’d go back and look at it again and by 8 a.m. I had another space rented in the Spexarth Building.”

Christensen’s immediate challenge was to figure out the status of her court records during the weeks following the fire when tenants were not allowed back into the building. “The clerks at the courthouse were amazing in terms of making photocopies of stacks and stacks of records. A lot of those records were salvageable, but we didn’t know that at the time.” (Christensen has a private practice and also does work for Clatsop County probation counseling).

The fire’s emotional toll took a few weeks to sink in, but the loss sparked Christensen to make sweeping changes in the way she operates her business. Realizing she needed to expand and delegate, she hired a new assistant to take care of clerical work, freeing up more time to see clients. She also contracted with another therapist who could share in the work Christensen provides for the courts.

“It was the small things after the fire that I felt really irritated about. I locked my self out of my new office three or four times because it had a funny handle. My favorite black blazer hung on the back of my office door in #10 and I forget that and go to my closet to look for it, and it’s no longer there. None of these things are rocket science, but being a creature of habit and a highly-scheduled person, these kind of disrup- tions really stuck with me for weeks afterwards.”

However, Christensen says she knew from the very beginning that good things would eventually result from this very bad situation. “What came up for me was a bigger piece about the process of ageing. As we age we don’t remember everything and I’ve been someone who pretty much always remembers things, but not having my records I realized I didn’t remember and I couldn’t look it up. It was kind of a gift to get in touch with how it’s going to feel to not have access to all that stuff. At some point, I’ll have to look at a picture or ask a friend.”

Pamela Christensen, MA is a professional counselor.


Robert Brown Financial Group
Robert Brown Financial Group dig their new location at the Red Building

Since 2007, Ann Lederer has worked for the Clatsop County Court Appointed Special Advocates for children (CASA) program. CASA had a long tenant history in # 10 6th Street prior to the fire. “I loved that building,” says Lederer, “there was something about being over the water and seeing the trolley go by. I was thankful for it every day, it’s irreplaceable.”

Lederer received a call from a CASA volunteer the night the fire broke out. “He suggested I look out of the window of my home. I did, and I could see flames. I immediately threw on some clothes and went down to the fire.” Lederer says she felt compelled to go to the scene and stand with other #10 tenants there. “We were just stunned and watching,” she recalled.

Chief amongst Lederer’s worries were her client files, which contain sensitive and confidential information. Were they secure? Could they be retrieved? When? Her second thought was about the toy donations that were wrapped and ready to go for a Christmas party the non-profit would be hosting for foster children. Eventually, CASA’s client files were salvaged and were legible but considerably smoke damaged. Nonetheless, Lederer was able to secure and dispose of them properly.

Immediately after the fire community members provided an amazing response in the form of donations. “Within 24 hours we replaced all the toys,” said Lederer who continued to deal with a huge flood of inquiries from those who wanted to know how they too could donate.

One of the lingering challenges faced by for- mer #10 tenants has been complicated insurance liability debates that are ongoing. Many tenants await partial rent refunds as the fire occurred halfway through the month. “I’m sure they are doing their best, but for a small non-profit, a couple of weeks worth of rent reimbursement is significant,” Lederer said.

Going into the building weeks after the fire was emotionally hard for Lederer. “It’s an unreal experience to go someplace that you’ve been every single day for years and see it transformed into something so sad.” While she did lose per- sonal items in the fire; a painting by local artist Darren Orange and years worth of Garden Tour posters from CASA fundraisers, directors from other local CASA programs reached out, donating artwork for the new space.

Ultimately, the fire forced Lederer “to think about the kind of work we do and about the kids who we work with. These are kids who leave home with maybe a trash bag full of their belongings,” she said.

“It really puts everything in perspective.”

“The silver lining is that we are improving rather than just recreating the old system. I took the situation as an opportunity to think about the ways in which we had operated. I’m in the process of changing from settled patterns and ways of doing things to the new ways we receive and process information.”

CASA’s new home is in Suite 401 of the Spexarth Building, 818 Commercial St. The City of Astoria had had an option on the space, but after the fire, decided to make it available to busi- nesses affected by the disaster. The Spexarth’s location on a diagonal from the courthouse is convenient for CASA staff and volunteers who may be required at court hearings as often as four or five times on a given work day.

Ann Lederer is Executive Director of Clatsop County CASA.

When Catastrophe Happens, It
Often Opens The Door For
New Business Relationships.
Join us in the collective celebration of the new
office location for five businesses that have
relocated from the #10 Sixth Street to
the Red Building office suites at:
20 Basin Street Astoria, Or.

The newly relocated offices of:

Brown Financial Group
Dr. Daryl Birney
Thrivent Financial Group
Eagle Financial Group
Dan Van Thiel Attorney at Law
Rosemary Berdine Psy. D

Open House at the Red Building
Professional office suites.
We invite you to explore and get acquainted
with our new offices take a mini tour, have a
glass of wine and enjoy some appetizers.

Where: Red Building Professional Office Suites
Red Building 20 Basin Street Astoria, Or.
When: April 27th 2011 Time 5:00-7:00 pm.

Categories
FEATURES

Coming back.

April 2011 cover“BEEP, BEEP, BEEP” . . . a defective security device at the west entrance of NO. 10 6th St. played its insistent alarm. For several days before the fateful fire of December 16 on Astoria’s historic waterfront, the thing apparently needing a battery, annoyed the hell out of just about everyone. Now in retrospect it was as if the historic structure – once home to Bumble Bee executives and waterfront factory that boxed the cans of gold, oily tuna – was calling out a warning.

As building tenants got word and came to the scene to watch the flames engulf one of Astoria’s most famous 20th century restaurants, there was some relief and hope that the multiplex NO. 10 would escape destruction. As the night grew on, and the building exploded in flames, shock, heartbreak, and confusion resided.

The Astoria Fire Department had been called to a single dwelling fire – and by the time they arrived, the second fire was discovered. Astoria Fire Chief Leonard Hanson sent in his volunteer A-man, Kevin Miller. The west end of the ground floor was a blaze. Even for Miller, of whom Hanson describes as dangerously courageous, he knew that the fire had already breached security levels and resources to fight what would become that towering inferno on the Astoria Waterfront.

Categories
NETWORK

Network – Community Listings

WORKSHOPS/CLASSES

FREE WORKSHOP DEMOS MICROSOFT OFFICE 2010. With the latest software release of Microsoft’s Office 2010, the Astoria Warrenton Area Chamber of Commerce is partner- ing with Clatsop Economic Development Resources and Microsoft to bring a free workshop to businesses and individuals interested in learning about the changes and new features before purchasing. Attendees will learn about the newest release and how it differs from 2007 and 2003 versions, how it may maximize production and whether it is a wise technology investment. The workshop is scheduled for Tuesday, October 12th, 8am to 10am at the Holiday Inn Express in Astoria. Business owner Jane Francis of Personal Computer Training will facilitate the workshop. Microsoft has provided door prizes, and refreshments will be served. The event is open to the public and reservations are required due to space limitations by calling Rose Alsbury at the Astoria Warrenton Chamber, 503.325.6311 or by email to rose@ oldoregon.

DOES FOOD RUN YOUR LIFE? Come to Overeaters Anonymous every Wednesday from 7-8pm in the Seaside Public Library, Board Room B. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Everyone welcome! (if you have questions call 503-505- 1721).

FREE COMPUTER CLASSES AT TILLAMOOK COUNTY LIBRARIES. Tillamook County Libraries will be offering free basic computer classes this fall. Sign up for a free one-on-one session where you can ask questions and learn at your own pace. Classes will be held on Saturdays at the Tillamook County Library September 11th, 18th and 25th and October 2nd and 9th. Additional sessions will be held at library branches in October and November. Registration is limited, so contact your local library soon and reserve your space.

PRACTICAL FRENCH. In this Practical French class you will learn key words and expressions and important phrases to get by using transportation, in markets, restaurants, at theaters and when attending other entertainment events. Gretchen Counsman, instructor, has designed the content of the course for various levels of French language learners. Four Tuesdays, September 7 through 28, from 5:30PM – 7:30PM at the Rockaway Community Center, Hwy 101 N. Rockaway. Class cost is $41. Those who are interested in taking this class should sign up as soon as possible by calling Tillamook Bay Community College at 503-842-8222, EXT 0; TOLL FREE 888-306-8222, EXT 0.

SPIRITUAL WRITING FOR MEN AND WOMEN. Instructor Gail Balden is a writer, educator and workshop presenter with over 30 years of teaching experience. Her work has been published in anthologies, literary journals and national magazines. She teaches one-day writing workshops and writes a monthly column on the joys of small town life for the North Coast Citizen. Visit her web site at www.creativejourneys.net. LIFE DRAWING. Every Wednesday, 3-5pm, The Alabaster Jar, 1184 Commercial St, Astoria 503-325-8632

French Conversation Group Re-Start. The group is de- voted to speaking French only. It is NOT a class, so please do not show up expecting to learn French from scratch. Once you step through the door of the Riverbend Room, it is French only. It will be on Saturdays, from 1-3pm at NCRD in the Riverbend Room, starting Saturday, June 5. There is a nominal charge of $1/person/time. For more information email Jane or call her 503-368-3901 or, call Paul Miller at 503-368-5715.

CREATIVE WRITING CLASS. For Senior Adults and Those Who Love Them. Necanicum Village Senior Living Com- munity in Seaside, Oregon, will be holding a six-week Cre- ative Writing class, beginning Wednesday, June 30, 2PM to 3:30 PM at 2500 S. Roosevelt Drive, Seaside. This class will be ongoing six-week sessions and will be comprised of residents of Assisted Living at Necanicum Village and citizens of the Seaside area communities who would like to participate. The instructor is Robin Adair, who has over 20 years experience teaching Creative Writing. The cost is $55 for each six-week session. Please contact Deborah, Community Sales Manager, at Necanicum Village, phone number 503-738-0900 by Monday, June 28, 2010, to register or for questions.

Library2Go Basics. Second Saturday of each month 9:00am-10:00am. Over 5000 audio books and videos can be downloaded to computers and digital devices through the Library2Go database accessible through the Astoria Public Library web site. All downloads are free to access with your library card. Learn the how to make the most of this extraordinary resource. Free, at the Astoria Public Library.

Computer Basics. Third Saturday of each month 9:00am- 10:00am. If you’re new to PC computers or just needing to update basic skills, this class is for you. Each class is tailored to meet the needs of participants. Free, at the Astoria Public Library.

The Lower Columbia Classics Car Club. Invitation to all who are interested in Collector Cars to attend one of our monthly meetings. The meetings are held at Steve Jordan’s Shop Building, located at 35232 Helligso Lane in rural Astoria – meet on the 3rd Thursday of each month. If you are interested and need the directions to get there, you may call Steve Jordan at 503-325-1807

LA LECHE LEAGUE OF ASTORIA. Our Meetings are the third Thursday of the month at 10:00 am, in the Parenting Classroom # 205 at Gray School, 785 Alameda, Astoria April15, Weaning: Four Chambers of the Heart, May 20 Great Expectations: Breastfeeding Benefits Everyone; June 17 Realistic Expectations: A New Baby in Your Family; July15 What to Expect: The Normal Course of Breastfeeding; August 19 New Beginnings: Baby’sFirst Foods. Accredited La Leche League Leaders: Liz Pietila @ 861-2050 or Janet Weidman @ 325-1306

Library2Go. Classes will be held on the 2nd Saturday of each month, in the Flag Room of the Astoria Public Li- brary, 450 10th Street, Astoria. This class is free of charge and open to everyone. Please contact the library for details and registration at 503-325-7323 or comments@ astorialibrary.org.

Open Art Night. 5:30 to 7 PM –1st & 3rd Weds. Bay City Arts Center, Bay City.

Life Drawing. 6 to 9 PM. Every 2nd & 4th Weds. Bay City Arts Center, Bay City.

Toddler Arts Group. Every Monday, 10:30 to 11:30 –Get your toddler started in the arts! Activities are geared towards ages 1–3, but age birth–5 are welcome. All children must be accompanied by a caregiver. Bay City Arts Center, Bay City.

Clay Open-Studio. At the Hoffman Center Annex, 594 Laneda, Manzanita, Tuesdays 10-7pm for those 12 & over. Children’s clay open studio is on Thursdays from 3-5. Open to all clay artists, or those who wish to learn with a supportive group. Center equipment available includes a slab roller, two potter’s wheels, a variety of tools and kiln time. $2 p/hour or $10 p/day per person. FMI: contact Glenna Gray 368-3739 or glenna@nehalemtel.net

CELEBRATE RECOVERY • Nazarene Church, 2611 3rd St, Tillamook. Adult & teen 12 step program. Child care provided. Call 503-812-3522 for more information. Tuesdays, 7-9, Dinner at 6 by donation.

OPEN ART NIGHT WITH PHAEDRA. Bay City Arts Center, 5680 A St, 5-7pm on Wednesdays.

BODY WORK•YOGA•FITNESS

YOGA NAMASTE. The Fall 2010 Yoga schedule at Yoga Namasté starts October 4 and ends December 18, 2010. During the 11 week term you can enjoy GENTLE YOGA- LEVEL 1 at 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays and Fridays. LEVEL 1-2 (Beginner and Intermediate) Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays at 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. Level 2-3 (Intermediate and Advanced) Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays at 6:15 to 8:45 a.m. LEVEL 1-2 Yoga flow at 9:30 to 11:00 a.m. on Saturdays. For more information: www. yoganam.com or call: 503 440 9761

YOGA RESTORATIVE. Private Individual Therapeutic and Restorative Yoga instruction with certified, Yoga Alliance registered yoga teacher SarahFawn Wilson, MA, RYT-500. Private group classes also available. For more information and for public class schedule, please call 503-440-6738 or email serraphon@msn.com.

BELLYDANCE. Every Sunday 6pm at The Alabaster Jar, 1184 Commercial St, Astoria 503-325-8632.

ECSTATIC DANCE. Ecstatic, trance, yogic, spirit filled), playful, improvisational, freestyle – We’re Dancing! Wed. at 6:30 at Pine Grove Community House, 225 Laneda Ave. in Manzanita. No experience necessary. You are welcome to bring Instruments of any sort to play along with what we’ve got going. Cost is a sliding scale from $5 – $7, or free if you really need to just be there.

Tsunami Dance. SUNDAY SANCTUARY – A class to celebrate and explore body, mind, and spirit within our dance, 6 to 8 pm. Free-form dance. Arrive at 6pm for a half hour of meditation before moving into an hour of dance. Drop-in as you wish at $12 per class. FMI: contact: Lisa (lisa@theplayfulspirit.com, 503-860-7711). At Lotus Yoga Studio, 1230 Marine Dr. in Astoria. Begins August 15.

LOTUS YOGA – NEW LOCATION. 1230 Marine Drive, Downtown Astoria. Specializing in ongoing Evening classes as well as a few new daytime classes starting in November and continuing on a month to month basis. Level 2 FLOW/STRENGTHENING Monday/Wednesday 6:00- 7:15PM. Level 1 BASICS/FOUNDATIONS Tuesday/Thursday 6:00-7:15 PM. All Level OPEN PRACTICE Friday 6:00-7:30 PM. All Level THERAPEUTIC Friday 9:00-10:00AM. All Level LUNCHTIME CLASS Tuesday 12:20-12:40. All Level GENTLE YIN 1st Wednesday of each month 7:30-8:30PM. Call (503)298-3874, Email lotusyoga@live.com, website www.lotusyogaonline.com for more information.

YOGA NAMASTÉ.The Fall 2010 Yoga schedule at Yoga Namasté starts October 4 and ends December 18, 2010. During the 11 week term you can enjoy GENTLE YOGA- LEVEL 1 at 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays and Fridays. LEVEL 1-2 (Beginner and Intermediate) Mon- days, Wednesdays, Fridays at 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. Level 2-3 (Intermediate and Advanced) Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays at 6:15 to 8:45 a.m. LEVEL 1-2 Yoga flow at 9:30 to 11:00 a.m. on Saturdays. For more information: www. yoganam.com or call: 503 440 9761

YOGA SMA EXPLORATION. Yoga instructor Linda Sanderlin LMT, introduces SMA yoga, a practice evolved from Feldenkrais and Alexander technique, found to be very effective for people with a limited range of motion. Tues and Sat. classes at Parinamah in Manzanita. $5 p/class. FMI: Call Linda (503)867-3943; or via e-mail: 4lsanderlin@gmail.com.

YOGA NCRD. Monday, Yoga Of The Heart, 8:15 am – 9:45 am Instructor: Lorraine Ortiz (no drop ins). Monday, Level II, 5:45 pm – 7:15 pm Instructor: Nicole Hamic Wednesday, Yoga Stretch, 8:15 am – 9:45 am Instructor: Lucy Brook Thursday, Level I, 5:45 pm – 7:15 pm Instruc- tor: Charlene Gernert Friday, Very Gentle Yoga, 8:15 am – 9:45 am Instructor: Lucy Brook Saturday, Mixed Levels, 8:00 am – 9:30 am Instructor: Lorraine Ortiz

YOGA • Manzanita. The Center for the Contemplative Arts, Manzanita: Tuesday evenings 5 – 5:45pm. $35 for 5 classes. Call 368-6227 for more info.

YOGA IN GEARHART. Gearhart Workout. For more information log on to www.gearhartworkout.com 3470 Hwy. 101 N. Suite 104 in Gearhart

YOGA • Nehalem. Ongoing yoga classes at NCRD are as follows: Monday, Level II, 5:15-6:45 pm, Nicole Hamic; Wednesday, Morning Yoga Stretch, 8-9:30 am, Lucy Brook; Thursday, Yoga for Parents & Kids, 3:45-4:45 pm, Charlene Gernert; Thursday, Level I, 5:45 – 7:15 pm, Charlene Gernet; Friday, Very Gentle Yoga, 8-9:30 am, Lucy Brook.

T’AI CHI. The Center for the Contemplative Arts, Manza- nita: Wednesday Mornings 10-11:30. $30/month. Call 368-6227 for more info.

TAEKWON-DO. Confidence, discipline, self-esteem and respect are only a few of the traits you will develop in this class while improving overall fitness. Ages: 8 -Adult fami- lies welcome! Mondays / Wednesdays, 6:00 – 7:00pm, through June 17th. Session Fee: $24 Resident’s Card / $36 Non-resident. Location: Bob Chisholm Community Center – 1225 Ave. A, Seaside For Registration call the POOl: 503:738-3311 Center – 1225 Ave. A, Seaside For Registration call the POOl: 503:738-3311 POOl: 503:738-3311 Center – 1225 Ave. A, Seaside For Registration call the POOl: 503:738-3311

Haystack Lectures

First Thursdays of each month in the Cannon Beach Li- brary, 131 N. Hem- lock St., Cannon Beach. 7-8:30pm

• Jan. 6: Katie Voelke, executive director, North Coast Land Conservancy: “The Landscape of the Whale, a Plan for the Greater Ecola Natural Area”

• Feb. 3: Shawn Ste- phensen, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Refuge Wildlife Biologist: “Tufted Puffin Monitoring at Haystack Rock”

• March 3: Brandy Bierly Hussa, edu- cator and freelance writer: “Building the Next Generation: Sharing Nature With Young Children”

• April 7: Ramona Radonich, inter- pretive ranger, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department: “Survivor: Tidepools”

 

LEARN SELF DEFENSE IN ILWACO. Kenpo Karate for Adults. River City School, 127 SE Lake St, Tuesdays @7:00pm – 8:45pm, $45/mo Inquire /sign up: jbgroove1@juno.com phone: 360-665-0860. 7:00pm – 8:45pm,

KENPOKarate for Kids –River City School, 127 Lake Street SE, Ilwaco, Every Thursday @ 4:00pm – 5:00pm, $45/mo.

SPIRITUALITY

TIBETAN BUDDHIST DHARMA GROUP. Dharma River, meets Mondays 7:30 – 9 pm, 1230 Marine Dr., Suite 304 in Lotus Yoga’s studio. Meditation, sadhana practice, teachings & discussion. Dharma River is a satellite of the Portland Sakya Center. Contact Dharma teacher, Rosetta Hurley, 338-9704 for more info.

Center For Spiritual Living of the North Coast. CSLNC is for those who want to grow spiritually, all faiths and paths welcome. Sunday Celebration and Children’s Church 10:30 a.m, 66 4th St., Warrenton. www.center- forspiritualliving.org and 503-791-2192.

A SILENT MEDITATION • with Lola Sacks. St. Catherine’s Center for the Contemplative Arts, Manzanita: Monday Nights 5 – 5:45 Call 368-6227 for more info.

LECTIO DIVINA • Meditation with Holy Scripture. The Center for the Contemplative Arts, Manzanita: Tuesday Mornings 10-11:30. Call 368-6227 for more info.

LABYRINTH WALK • Grace Episcopal Church, 1545 Franklin St, Astoria, 3-6. Every 1st Sunday.

VOLUNTEER

Weekly Alder Creek Farm Community Garden. Work Parties – Tuesdays, 10 am – Noon. Help out the Coastal Food Ecology Center, community garden, permaculture garden and harvesting for the Wheeler Food Bank. Tasks may include: greenhouse and garden weeding, planting, and watering.

FOOD ROOTS AND THE TILLAMOOK FARMERS’. Market seek youth and adults who can work 2 or 3 Saturdays be- tween June 20th and September 25th at the Community Table of the Tillamook Farmers’ Market. Youth between the ages of 10-18 are needed to work from 8:00-2:30 while adult shifts are broken into 8:00am-11:00am and 11:30am-2:30pm. If you are interested in volunteering, please contact Food Roots at (503) 842-3154, extension 2, or e-mail Food Roots at volunteer@foodrootsnw.org for an application.

Meetings

ENCORE Retirement Learning Community. Is an as- sociation of retirement-age people who share a love of learning. Established in 2001 by a Steering Committee of retired adults, ENCORE is sponsored by Clatsop Com- munity College. We meet for lunch the first Tuesday of every month. We try to alternate between North and South County, so look for these Community Notes in your local Newspaper to see the place of choice. Our Lunch Bunch get-togethers are a wonderful venue for meeting classmates over lunch, as well as new friends. Remember all guests that might be interested in ENCORE, or just want to know what we’re all about, are welcome. Please call Madeline Gobel, 503 325-3330.

BREASTFEEDING INFORMATION & SUPPORT. La Leche League’s monthly support group meetings provide an opportunity for both new and experienced mothers to share their questions or concerns, and to talk with each other about the special joys and challenges of parenting. We especially encourage expectant and new mothers to join us. Healthy babies and toddlers are always welcome at La Leche League meetings. We look forward to seeing you soon. Second Monday of the month at 10am- Astoria.

 

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Spartina, the killer weed, slays Moby Dick?

Spartina alternaflora-After fighting the local weed board, the state department of agriculture, and even the Nature Conservancy for almost 20 years, Nahcotta hotel owner Fritzi Cohen has signaled that she may be ready to sell the historic Moby Dick Hotel, site of some of the last remaining spartina grass on Willapa Bay. While who may buy the property, should she sell, is the big news and speculation in the area, the story of spartina and Willapa Bay is the one that will be told on these pages over the next months, as an occasional series. It’s a story of intrigue, pitting neighbor against neighbor, species against species, and chemical against plant. The winners and losers are still to be determined, but this story is part of a larger story of the war on invasive species that’s being waged in Washington and Oregon, as well as around the world. A war that, like most, may not be winnable, or even necessary.

Moby DickWashington State has a long history of laws and regulations governing noxious weeds (defined as “a plant that when established is highly destructive, competitive, or difficult to control by cultural or chemical practices”), dating back to 1881, prior to statehood. The original legislation made it the duty of the landowner and the district supervisor of roads to control certain weeds on property they owned or managed. In 1907 the legislature expanded the law by requiring road district supervisors to inspect for weeds and enforce the statute on private lands, as well as along roadsides. The statute also included the authority to enter lands and cut down weeds if the owner didn’t take action.

In 1921, there was legislation that allowed landowners to petition to the Board of County Commissioners to create Weed Districts. This effort was enhanced in 1929, to provide for the election of three-member boards of directors who had the authority to administer the weed control statutes.

In 1969, RCW 17.10 – Noxious Weeds – Control Boards, was originally enacted. The law provides for the formation of county noxious weed control boards, and a state weed board, which puts together a state weed list. Like so many other laws with lists, it’s all about the list. We’ll take a closer look at the Washington State noxious weed list later in this column, and in future columns. For now, take note that spartina is on the list, and has recently been upgraded to “A” status, which targets it for “eradication”, or extinction, in Washington. In 1987, RCW 17.10 was revised and broadened, with an expanded focus to encompass threats to all natural resources (not only farmland).

The Pacific County Noxious Weed Control Board (weed board) was formed in 1972. It consists of five members, appointed by the Board of Pacific County Commissioners. Tim Crose is the coordinator for the Pacific County weed board. His job is to carry out the weed laws by surveying the county for listed weeds and helping landowners to manage those weeds as prescribed in the laws (in other words, get rid of them). In his 6 years in the coordinator position, Crose has dealt with 12 infractions of the law. He can write tickets for up to $2500, but hasn’t had much use for that. He says that he first tries to work with the landowners, and usually gets cooperation.

Another part of Crose’s job is to help the weed board, which consists of landowners in the 5 districts in the county, to identify weeds of concern, and recommend changes to the state weed list. Though private landowners can also directly petition the state to include new weeds on their list, it is often the county weed boards that do the official petitioning, Crose told me. So, every year in March, there’s a public meeting where the “B” weeds are adopted for control (i.e. prevention of spread, but not eradication), and then by April 30 (just past for 2010), the state needs the requests for inclusion onto their list by the counties. (For 2010, Pacific County is requesting Japanese eelgrass for inclusion on the state list. It’s another Willapa Bay “invader” that has been targeted by local aquaculture groups.)

The District #4 weed board member is Bob Rose, a beef cattle rancher in Bay Center. He owns and operates Rose Ranch, on Highway 101, and has been on the weed board from the beginning. He told me that the original impetus for forming the board was tansy ragwort, a plant that is toxic to cattle and horses. “It spreads bad, animals carry it, cars carry it, and it’s spread all the way up the Willapa Valley,” he said. Gorse, a close relative to Scotch broom, was also a problem plant at that time, according to Rose.

In the first few years, Rose told me, the weed board members were elected by local landowners. There haven’t been many volunteers for the job, but Rose says that it’s been relatively “low key” for him as a board member all these years (until the recent ruckus with the Moby Dick). Timber companies have been cooperative, as has the Bonneville Power Administration, according to Rose. He said he only remembers one person being fined, with the minimum fine ($350).

Spraying with herbicides is most effective, according to Rose, but the listed weeds can be controlled by mowing or pulling. Rose uses Garlon 3a (active ingredient is trichlopyr) and Crossbow (Garlon 3a + 2,4-D, a component of Agent Orange) to rid his property and adjacent roadsides (over 1500 acres) of weeds.

To find out more about noxious weeds in Pacific County, contact Crose at (360) 875-9425, or by e-mail. For more information about noxious weeds in Washington State, contact Alison Halpern, Executive Secretary, WA State Noxious Weed Control Board, at (360) 902-2053. We’ll be looking at the workings of these boards and the weed list in more detail in future Weed Wars columns.

In Oregon, there is also a state noxious weed board, and local weed boards in some counties, which have regulatory powers. The Oregon Dept. of Agriculture, Plant Division, is where the noxious weed program resides in Oregon. They have a better definition for noxious weeds, which are plant species that: “cause severe production losses or increased control costs to the agricultural or horticultural industries of Oregon; endanger native flora and fauna by their encroachment into forest, range, and conservation areas; hamper the full utilization and enjoyment of recreational areas; or are poisonous, injurious, or otherwise harmful to humans and animals.”

Japanese knotweedThe noxious weed program in Tillamook, Clatsop and Columbia counties is administered by the North Coast Weed Management Area Committee (NCWMAC). They meet every two months, and the meetings are well attended by county roads, forestry, and parks staff, and timber company representatives, according to Dave Ambrose, one of the coordinators of the group. The weeds the NCWMAC is working to control are knotweed (Japanese, Himalayan and giant) mostly in river systems, purple loosestrife along Youngs Bay, common reed in Fort Stevens State Park, spurge laurel at Sunset Beach, garlic mustard in Columbia County, and even spartina, which showed up 2 years ago at the mouth of the Skipanon River. NCWMAC gives EDRR (early detection, rapid response) workshops to train citizens in recognizing weeds of concern. The next workshop is June 19, all day, at Fort Clatsop. For more information, give Ambrose, of the Clatsop Soil and Water Conservation District, a call at 503-325-4571.

And yes, there is a Federal Noxious Weed Act — Public Law 93-629, enacted in 1975. This law is currently part of the Farm Bill, and yes, there is a federal noxious weed list.

In the UK, The Weeds Act of 1959 lists noxious weeds whose spread must be controlled, including common ragwort, broadleaved and curled leaved dock, and spear and creeping thistle. They are all native species but were deemed problematic in the post-war drive for agricultural efficiency and self-sufficiency in food. The Wildlife & Countryside Act of 1981 lists Japanese knotweed and giant hogweed, and makes it an offense to plant or to cause either species to spread in the wild.

Similarly, there are noxious weed laws across the country and the world. The war is global, and the enemy, the rules, and the progress, are tenuous.

Stay tuned for Episode 2 of Weed Wars, The Attack of the Grasses, where we’ll start to tell the story of spartina in Willapa Bay – how it got there, when we noticed it, how we’re fighting it, and what the likely future consequences of the battle will be. We’ll highlight the players in this battle, and see how it fits in with the overall war.

In the meantime, remember, if you have any listed noxious weeds on your property (like English ivy, Scotch broom, or hundreds more), you better get rid of them before the weed board hears about it…

Next month, back to Warrenton, where we’ll focus on a new wetland mitigation deal between the Palmbergs, the City of Astoria, and the North Coast Land Conservancy.

Stay dry, and stay active.