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NEWS

North Coast Land Conservancy Meet & Greet – 25th Anniversary Celebration

THE NORTH COAST LAND CONSERVANCY is taking its Anniversary Celebration to the communities who have made their work possible. From 5:00 to 7:00 pm join the staff and board for light refreshments and birthday cake and celebrate 25 years of conservation connections on the Oregon Coast. Check out photos and presentations about the conservation work NCLC is doing in the area where you live.

Speak with NCLC staff and board members about the work they do. Join the celebration, and find out more about how you can get involved and make a difference on the North Oregon Coast! FMI: (503) 738-9126 or www.nclctrust.org.

 

Stanley Marsh Stewardship
Stanley Marsh Stewardship

NCLC 25th Anniversary Celebrations:
All Events 5pm – 7pm

June 15  • ASTORIA
Columbia Room, Clatsop Community College, 1651 Lexington Avenue

June 16 • Cannon Beach
Community Hall, 207 N. Spruce Street

June 21 •  Gearhart
Trails End Art Gallery, 656 A Street

June 22 • Warrenton
Community Center, 170 S.W 3rd Street

June 28 • Seaside
Old City Hall Building, Corner of Broadway and Highway 101

June 29 • Nehalem
North County Recreation District Building, 36155 9th Street

ALSO: Pick up a copy of the NCLC 25th ANNIVERSARY PUBLICATION featuring stories about lands they conserve, people who have been key supporters throughout the years, and of course many stunning photos of this beautiful North Coast landscape that NCLC works to conserve and protect.

Download a PDF version at nclctrust.org.  If you’d like to get a printed copy to read, stop by Seaside office or call to find out locations around the North Coast where you can pick one up.

Categories
NEWS

Bulletin

Tillamook Estuaries Partnership Hosts: 8th Annual Bounty of the Bay Fundraiser and Fishing Tournament
Fishing enthusiasts gather JUNE 3-4,  for the Annual Tillamook Estuaries Partnership (TEP) Bounty on the Bay.  Now in its eighth year, Bounty on the Bay has become one of the most anticipated spring events for anglers on the North Coast.

This weekend event highlights the best Tillamook Bay has to offer: amazing scenery, humongous fish, great local food, and jovial company. Now an anticipated tradition, Bounty on the Bay features two days of revelry: kicking off on Friday night with a Dinner and Salmon Fishing Demonstration, featuring tips that are bound to come in handy during Saturday’s Premier Fishing Tournament, and the grande finale: a sumptuous Seafood Feast (with fish donated by long time supporter Pacific Seafood and Oyster), Awards Ceremony, and Silent Auction.

Both events take place at the historic Old Mill in Garibaldi. TEP is proud to present local pros John Kirby and Bob Rees who will lead the Salmon Fishing Demo on Friday night during the BBQ Pork Dinner, followed by our esteemed guest speaker, Jim Martin (former Chief of Fisheries, ODFW) on Saturday night. This year is not just for the fishermen- those interested in a different bay adventure can participate in a guided kayak tour of the Garibaldi harbor.  This action-packed weekend will raise vital funds to support TEP’s local grant program that encourages research, habitat restoration, and education projects throughout Tillamook County.

Registration is open and necessary for all facets of the event.

Please register by May 31st!  Registration forms are available online by going to www.tbnep.org or, to obtain more information regarding the event, contact Sierra Lauder by phone at (503) 322-2222 or by email at Bounty@tbnep.org.

This annual fundraiser supports TEP’s efforts to implement the Tillamook Bay Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (CCMP). ##

Garage Sale
The Cannon Beach Women’s Auxiliary, American Legion, will hold their annual Garage Sale on SATURDAY MAY 21ST, 2011, from 9am to 4pm. The Sale is held at the Legion Hall in Mid-town.  This sale features lamps, furniture, bedding, kitchen wares, holiday decorations, books and much more.  Sorry, no clothing, shoes or large appaliances.

Anyone wishing to donate to the sale can bring items to the Legion Hall on Thursday or Friday, May l9th and 20th, for sorting and pricing.

Funds from the sale help the Legion Auxiliary to contribute to local high school scholarships, veterans hospitals, Xmas baskets and other community activities.

Categories
CULTURE MUSIC NEWS

North Head Lighthouse Benefit Concert with Radio Cowboy

Radio CowboyThe North Head lighthouse is in need of restoration.  For 113 years, this iconic tower has stood watch on the northwestern headland of Cape Disappointment.  As the primary, outer coast lighthouse it has served to guide mariners safely into the mouth of the Columbia River.  Over the years, the marches of time and the elements have left their indelible marks on the lighthouse, and now its service to us must be returned.  The North Head lighthouse needs our help.

The Keepers of the North Head Lighthouse formed in 2009 to insure a steadfast vigil and sound legacy for the lighthouse.  The Keepers have been promoting awareness, raising publicity and spearheading the movement to restore the North Head lighthouse.

SATURDAY, MAY 14TH, the Keepers host musical trio, RADIO COWBOY, at the Columbia-Pacific Heritage Museum in Ilwaco, WA.  All proceeds from the concert will go to the restoration of North Head. 7pm, $10.00 suggested donation.  Refreshments will be provided and also available by donation.

RADIO COWBOY includes national FROGTOWN recording and touring artist Heather Christie, Emmy-Winning musician Philip Pelletier, and San Francisco based singer/songwriter David Miottel. Radio Cowboy combines sounds inspired by artists like Joni Mitchell, Rickie Lee Jones, Gillian Welch, Counting Crows, Emmy Lou Harris, Mark Knopfler and Dead Can Dance, creating a harmony loaded, atmospheric twang that everyone enjoys.

FMI: Steve Wood, Cape Disappointment State Park, (360) 642-3029, lcic@parks.wa.gov.

Categories
NEWS

United Paws Offers New Program: “A Trip to Snip!”

Kitty

In addition to regular financial assistance to low-income residents for their cats and dogs and to the caregivers of feral cats, United Paws of Tillamook is adding a new service thanks to a north county veterinarian.  The most effective way for United Paws to spend supporter donations is to have what are called “clinics,” when at least one veterinarian performs spay/neuter surgeries all day.  United Paws is now able to hold such clinics approximately once a month for the pets of the economically disadvantaged and for those residents who care for feral cats.  Regardless of income, anyone wishing to help feral cats may take advantage of this service.  Trapping assistance and humane traps may be available, depending on volunteer and trap availability.  In addition, if clients cannot take their cat or dog to the clinic, because they cannot drive or do not have access to transportation, volunteers will pick up and transport the animals to the clinic, then back home again.

Each clinic will focus on one part of the county: south, central, or north.  United Paws is therefore calling upon all low-income residents with dogs or cats in need of spaying or neutering and all residents feeding feral cats who haven’t been sterilized to call the United Paws hotline and leave a message to make a reservation for an upcoming clinic: (503) 842-5663.

Not just spay and neuter
In addition to spay/neuter surgery, cats and dogs will receive pain medication and, if necessary, antibiotics.  Cats will receive mandated inoculations as well as flea and ear mite treatment; and they’ll be wormed.  Dogs will receive a distemper vaccination and will be wormed if necessary.  Rabies inoculations for either dogs or cats are the responsibility of the owner or caretaker.

Payment
“A Trip to Snip!” is not free.  United Paws will work with clients to establish an affordable fee, due when the client delivers the animal to the clinic or when the animal is picked up by volunteers.  This is to ensure appointments are kept.  The veterinarian is giving up one of his free days, so United Paws must ensure his time isn’t wasted as a result of no-shows.  Another reason United Paws must ask for payment toward this service is that all funds to carry out United Paws’ programs are raised by volunteers through private donations from the general public, grants, fundraising events, and adoption fees.  Volunteers receive no compensation, not even for gas.  United Paws receives no financial support from the county or any national group, and not one cent goes to salaries.  United Paws endeavors to get the most out of every dollar, and “A Trip to Snip!” guarantees that.  The more clients using this service can pay, the more United Paws can help others who also need the program.

Successful history
United Paws has been operating and offering critical animal services in Tillamook County since 2003. To date, United Paws has spayed and neutered more than 4,650 county cats and dogs who would not otherwise have been sterilized.  The group has thereby reduced the number of unwanted and abandoned animals, as well as alleviated and prevented animal suffering as a result of homelessness.  Since January 1, 2011, United Paws has sterilized more than 280 cats and dogs.

Emergency care
In addition to spay/neuter services, United Paws also runs Annie’s Emergency Fund to provide veterinary care for those animals in immediate need of help, such as to treat pain resulting from a traffic accident.  In 2010, United Paws paid more than $61,000 to local veterinarians to cover spay/neuter and emergency services.

Categories
NEWS

Exploring Our Oceans: The Mysteries of the Tides and Tidepool Life

BootsA new temporary exhibit opens at the Cannon Beach History Center

The Cannon Beach History Center and Museum will host a dedication reception and lecture for the new temporary exhibit “Exploring our Oceans: the Mysteries of the Tides and Tidepool Life” on Wednesday, May 11, at 7 p.m.

Donna Lenius, Haystack Rock Awareness Program (HRAP) Marine Educator and Volunteer Coordinator, will explore the vibrant world between the tides and the extravagant wildlife visitors can see in the intertidal zone in her lecture “A Walk in the Tidepools: A Glimpse of the Ocean.”

The dedication reception will begin at 7 p.m., and will feature wine and refreshments. The reception will allow attendees a chance to view the exhibit, which was produced in partnership with HRAP and features historical artifacts, photography, and sea life specimens from tidepools.

From 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Lenius will examine what lives in the tidepools, the great lengths that life goes to exist there, and how the tidepool ecosystem is translated into a classroom.

This event is free and open to the public. Call 503-436-9301 for more information, or visit www.cbhistory.org.

Categories
NEWS

Garage Sale

The Cannon Beach Women’s Auxiliary, American Legion, will hold their annual Garage Sale on SATURDAY MAY 21ST, 2011, from 9am to 4pm. The Sale is held at the Legion Hall in Mid-town.  This sale features lamps, furniture, bedding, kitchen wares, holiday decorations, books and much more.  Sorry, no clothing, shoes or large appliances.

Anyone wishing to donate to the sale can bring items to the Legion Hall on Thursday or Friday, May l9th and 20th, for sorting and pricing.

Funds from the sale help the Legion Auxiliary to contribute to local high school scholarships, veterans hospitals, Xmas baskets and other community activities.

Categories
NEWS

Tillamook Estuaries Partnership Hosts: 8th Annual Bounty of the Bay Fundraiser and Fishing Tournament

Fishing enthusiasts gather JUNE 3-4,  for the Annual Tillamook Estuaries Partnership (TEP) Bounty on the Bay.  Now in its eighth year, Bounty on the Bay has become one of the most anticipated spring events for anglers on the North Coast.

This weekend event highlights the best Tillamook Bay has to offer: amazing scenery, humongous fish, great local food, and jovial company. Now an anticipated tradition, Bounty on the Bay features two days of revelry: kicking off on Friday night with a Dinner and Salmon Fishing Demonstration, featuring tips that are bound to come in handy during Saturday’s Premier Fishing Tournament, and the grande finale: a sumptuous Seafood Feast (with fish donated by long time supporter Pacific Seafood and Oyster), Awards Ceremony, and Silent Auction.

Both events take place at the historic Old Mill in Garibaldi. TEP is proud to present local pros John Kirby and Bob Rees who will lead the Salmon Fishing Demo on Friday night during the BBQ Pork Dinner, followed by our esteemed guest speaker, Jim Martin (former Chief of Fisheries, ODFW) on Saturday night. This year is not just for the fishermen- those interested in a different bay adventure can participate in a guided kayak tour of the Garibaldi harbor.  This action-packed weekend will raise vital funds to support TEP’s local grant program that encourages research, habitat restoration, and education projects throughout Tillamook County.

Registration is open and necessary for all facets of the event.

Please register by May 31st!  Registration forms are available online by going to www.tbnep.org or, to obtain more information regarding the event, contact Sierra Lauder by phone at (503) 322-2222 or by email at bounty@tbnep.org.

This annual fundraiser supports TEP’s efforts to implement the Tillamook Bay Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (CCMP).

Categories
NEWS

Oregon LNG Hearing on Friday the 13th

THE OREGON LNG legal saga will enter a new phase in May. In late April, the company withdrew their argument that all of Clatsop County’s judges are biased. As a result, Clatsop County Circuit Court Judge Phillip L. Nelson will hold a hearing on May 13 to evaluate the arguments being put forward by Clatsop County, Columbia Riverkeeper and the Northwest Property Rights Coalition in defense of Clatsop County’s right to make a final land use decision about Oregon LNG and its pipeline.

The County is asking the court to dismiss Oregon LNG’s claims that the county no longer has jurisdiction over the land use decision on the Oregon LNG pipeline due to the clock running out after the previous county commission’s decision last October.

The hearing will begin promptly at 9 am in courtroom 200 at the Clatsop County Courthouse in Astoria.

The Clatsop County Commission made a preliminary decision in March to deny the Oregon LNG pipeline project. Leucadia National Corporation, which is the NY-based financial backer for Oregon LNG, is indicating that community opposition is prompting Leucadia to reconsider its investment in Oregon LNG.

In other LNG news, local residents celebrated the 1-year anniversary of Bradwood Landing’s decision to pull the plug on their LNG terminal and pipeline project on May 4. Over 4 years of protests and legal action, and countless thousands of hours of volunteer time were required to cause the project to run out of money in attempting to procure local, state and federal permits. The project was scrubbed despite the backing of the previous Clatsop County Commission, and moves by the company to integrate into the local community.

Oregon House Bill 2700 (HB2700), which would allow a person that proposes removal or fill activity for construction or maintenance of a “linear facility” (read pipeline) to apply for a removal or fill permit, instead of the owner of the property, continued to move through the legislature in April and early May. The bill, called the “LNG fast-track authority bill” by anti-LNG activists, is currently being considered by the Senate Business, Transportation and Economic Development Committee. The bill passed the House 40-18 in March. Brad Witt (D-Clatskanie) voted for the bill, while Debbie Boone (D-Cannon Beach) voted against it. This is the 3rd attempt to pass this legislation in recent years.

Categories
NEWS

Special Districts Election Ballots Due May 17

BALLOTS have been mailed out to residents of Oregon for the 2011 special districts election and are due by May 17.

In Clatsop County, the only county-wide race with a challenger is for Port of Astoria Commissioner, Position 3. Tim Liddiard, a progressive and newcomer to politics, is running against the incumbent, Bill Hunsinger. Hunsinger won his seat on an anti-LNG, pro-union platform, and has been instrumental in guiding the Port towards being a more industrial, shipping-based agency. After a bitter battle with Oregon LNG, the Port has given up on the goal of ending the sub-lease on the Skipanon Peninsula with that company. Liddiard has promised to be more open and responsive to county residents, and focus on providing services to the whole county. He is critical of the decision to start a log export operation at the Port, and wants to start work right away to bring rail service to the whole county. (For more on Liddiard, see the April 2011 issue of HIPFiSH.)

In Tillimook County, one of the races that has generated a lot of interest has been the North County Recreation District (NCRD) board in Nehalem, which has 3 open seats that all have challengers. Only one incumbent, board chair Marie Ziemecki, is running. She is being challenged by Darrell Winegar, a former business owner who went to work for the Mohler Co-op in 1996. Lining up on the progressive side with Ziemecki are Julie Chick, former owner of Nehalem Bay Kayak Company, and Kevin Greenwood, Manager at the Port of Garibaldi since 2009, and former Manager of the City of Garibaldi. Greenwood also served on the NCRD board from 2005-2008. In addition to Winegar, two other conservatives are running – Jon Welsh (against Greenwood), part-owner of Manzanita Fresh Foods, and Angela Hanke (against Chick). The conservatives are against taxpayer funding of the district facilities, while the progressives would like to see continued public funding.

A similar situation exists with the Nehalem Bay Fire & Rescue District, with 3 conservatives trying to unseat current members of the board. The conservatives claim that the fire district is too big for the region it serves, and want to reduce taxpayer outlays.

Residents of Clatsop County should note that applications to serve on the county planning commission are due by May 13. The county board of commissioners recently voted to vacate all seven seats on the panel and invite the current members and new applicants to apply for the vacated positions. The planning commission advises the board of commissioners on land-use planning, conducts land-use hearings and implements the county’s zoning and comprehensive plan. The panel normally meets once a month.

For more information on the elections and appointments in Clatsop County, including drop-off sites, call the county clerk at 503-325-8511. In Tillamook County, call 503-842-3402.

Categories
NEWS

Editor’s sudden exit raises questions

WHEN I DIE, it would be great if Michael Burkett were still around these parts and would say something at my funeral. If that happens, I hope he talks about our common passion for words.

Mike Burkett
Michael Burkett

Personally, I would be honored if Michael would come to the gathering dressed in the same duds he wore at the first human Be-in at Golden Gate Park — the opening event for the Summer of Love. Hopefully my funeral would recycle some of that living color that’s been drained from today’s whitewashed world.

It may seem strange that I’m musing about my death in the wake of Michael’s untimely passing from the North Coast Citizen. Yet the event prods my sense that America’s press is becoming a lifeless shell of what it once was. The march of today’s media makes it easy to imagine that columnists like me won’t be around much longer.

In his own words, Michael was “forced to resign” from his position as editor of the North Coast Citizen. That statement is firmly disputed by the newspaper’s owner, Steve Forrester, whose family also owns the Daily Astorian and other news outlets. Both men could be correct, in my opinion, depending on how the word “forced” is used.

It bears noting that Michael’s resignation occurred amidst a heated local election. Days before Michael’s departure, a Manzanita-area Tea Party organizer singled out Michael as the reason why the North Coast Citizen fails to meet the political standards for a small-town newspaper. This opinion was posted by Jim Welsh, a candidate for local office, on a popular email list serve called the “BBQ.”

Welsh explained that the Citizen’s editorial content prompted his son Jon – also a candidate for local office — to stop stocking the local newspaper of record for customers at his business (Manzanita’s largest grocery store). For the past several months, shoppers have had to go elsewhere to buy the Citizen in order to read local news articles, commentary, and public notices.

The heat of this drama is turned up by the broader political context. Both Jim and Jon Welsh and their allied local candidates have upped the ante with anti-incumbent rhetoric. This mirrors the Tea Party insurgency against public officials that has been broadcast by the media at the state and federal levels.

In other words, the timing of Michael’s departure couldn’t have been worse. It makes it look as if the long arm of the Tea Party was successful in getting rid of him. Or, more specifically, that one of this newspaper’s [the Citizen] former advertisers – a business closely associated with the Tea Party — complained to the paper’s owners, who then somehow forced Michael to leave.

A different impression emerges from my conversation with Dave Fisher, who is serving as the Citizen’s interim editor. It appears the newspaper’s owners may have taken Michael to task for his colorful and sometimes biting efforts to tell the truth. Was that done to help restore calm to a community that’s become too inflamed for the common good? Or, was it done to mend relations with a former advertiser?

The answer to those questions could be “some of both.” It could be a blend of these things plus other factors I’m not privy to.

Regardless, this little drama prompts me to ponder bigger questions about our society. What happens when the loudest voices in the room are able to stifle communication? What happens when those voices treat the idea of “common good” as if it were communist hogwash, professing that most if not all public services should be either eliminated or controlled by private interests?

From what I’ve observed, that’s the gist of the Tea Party’s influence on public discourse in America, since it took the stage to disrupt town hall meetings on health care two years ago. At every turn, the idea of discussing and resolving problems by public or collective means has been torpedoed by this well-promoted group.

Does that kind of anti-public influence have any bearing – direct or indirect — on what happened to Michael Burkett? I want to believe it did not, but I don’t know.

In any event, the timing of this drama helps fuel the appearance that we are living in a corporate state. On the broader front, a collusion of business and government has depleted our limited resources. Rather than band together to counter this dynamic, citizens fight amongst ourselves while remaining resources are diverted from public needs into the hands of a private few.

What troubles me most is that I can picture a future where Americans are unable to freely discuss this concern in small-town newspapers. “Use your words,” we’ve told our children since they were toddlers. This column records my effort to model that advice as a grown-up.

I hope to see such efforts make a difference before I die. Maybe readers will be moved to think, debate, and try to integrate various viewpoints into greater truths. Perhaps all media outlets and businesses will become more supportive of open public discourse in our community.

At a minimum, it would be nice to know my family can pick up copies of my obituary at the local store that sells our favorite orange juice. Such things should foster common ground for the civil exchange of ideas, opinions and news.