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Geometric Origami Class: Folding Paper into Modular Shapes

Origami CollageTEACHING will be primarily through demonstration.  Students will also learn to follow written directions with origami folding symbols for each shape. Students are asked to bring 36 sheets of 6” by 6” origami paper. Recycled maps will be available for the 12 piece “ring”. This class is appropriate for beginner and intermediate folders, ages 10 to adult.

Barbara Baum Freethy, M.Ed. is a private practice therapist in Portland, ME., working with children who are challenged by attention deficit and autism spectrum disorders.  She frequently uses origami as an expressive therapy tool to enhance children’s self-esteem and creativity. Barbara is also a paper artist who has been teaching paper folding to adults and children for the past 15 years.

Sunday, May 22, 1:00 – 3:30 pm Hoffman Center, 594 Landeda Ave., Manzanita.

Cost: $30. To register, please visit http://hoffmanblog.org/.

Seaside High School Student Art Show

Seaside High School Art ShowDuring the month of May, the Seaside Public Library will host its annual exhibit of art work created by Seaside High School students.  The show explores a range of media including clay, collage, paintings, drawings and multi-media.  The title of this year’s show is “Spring Gleaning”.  The exhibit will run from May 3rd to May 31st and will be in the Community Room, foyer, and main library.

Located at 1131 Broadway, across from the Youth Center and Swimming Pool.  For more information please call (503)738-6742 or visit us at www.seasidelibrary.org and www.facebook.com/seasidepubliclibrary.

Rosie Bergeron At PPP

Grocery ShoppingIN MAY, Pier Pressure Productions, is featuring the work of Rosie Bergeron, gallery manager, artist, and resident of Brooklyn, NY, with the original piano compositions by Christopher Andrew Corbell. Bergeron’s dramatic wood block prints are images of daily life.  They are a celebration of the mundane, be it washing dishes, buying groceries, or walking about the neighborhood. She likes to use the images as a meditation on contemporary femininity and an examination of her autobiographical “theater”.

“As a native of the Pacific Northwest I was taught relief and sculptural wood carving by my father in our basement. He is an avid fan of native American woodworking and when I was growing up I would assist him in classes he taught to the locals. When I entered college and took my first woodcut print class I was hooked. The transformation of carved wood to multiple paper prints was a way to link my past with things I wanted to talk about in the present.”

Artist reception for Astoria 2nd Saturday Art Walk, May 14, 5-9pm. PPP is located at 260 10th St.

Dale Flowers at Old Town Frame

Dale Flowers

Daffodils by Dale Flowers

LIKE MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY, Astoria artist Dale Flowers, gets up close and personal with Prismacolor pencil in a series of work dedicated to “flowers” cultivated on the Pacific Northwest coast. “Each flower that is used as the subject matter is drawn in a series of six to eight drawings over a period of a month, refining and exploring the design.” These bright studies, most 22” by 28” are big in color and form. The artist is featured through the month of May. Artist Reception is Sat, May 14, Astoria 2nd Saturday Art Walk. Old Town Frame is located 1287 Commercial, 503.325.5221.

The Art & Psyche Show

Nancy

Nancy Karacand

Art and the Psyche are mystically intertwined.  Life passages, transitions, changes in health, job, or  relationships– all of these Transformative  areas of life – can be brought to life  in artistic form – and often are in the area of art therapy.

On May 14, 5-9pm The Art & Psyche Show will be on display at the Astoria Music Festival Office located at 1271 Commercial Street, during the Second Saturday Astoria Art Walk.

Presented by Yvonne Edwards and Nancy Karacand, both trained psychotherapists who share a love of art as a creative therapeutic medium for  emotional growth and healing– the Art & Psyche show will offer a variety of unique art processes.

According to Edwards, “Art & Psyche is a creative multi-media process that I use as an adjunct to psychotherapy.  We are always growing, developing, transitioning and evolving from a familiar state of being to an unknown state of becoming. These art exercises enhance psychological self-discovery and insight – for people who are in therapy – as well as those who are not.   It leads to self-directed evolution, experiential dialogue with our art, and a renewed appreciation for the richness of our own inner world – one with heart and meaning.”

Yvonne

Yvonne Edwards

Karacand’s work for the show will center on creating a series of stone and beaded pendants that will reflect the colors and qualities of the chakras.  She has been a Healing Touch practitioner for the past 10 years and incorporates her awareness of energetic healing into the creation of each unique piece.
The Art & Psyche show developed after several workshops the pair held, and exhibits  include: The Maori drawing, The Five Universal Shapes, the Illustrated Journal, the Mandala, the tile mosaic of one’s Life Path, mask-making, dream painting, drawing a safe place, doll making and other art.  Janet Maher also brings samples of her work with Soul Collage.

Karacand and Edwards will continue throughout the year with workshops, women’s gatherings, children’s Art Camps, and other community focused events. FMI: contact Yvonne Edwards at 503 338 7202 or Nancy Karacand at 503 325 9217.

Impressions of New Zealand – Marie Powell at RiverSea Gallery

New Zealand art

Bouquet at Dusk by Marie Powell

Vibrant, energetic imagery of exotic plant life takes on a celebratory nature in artist Marie Powell’s newest series of monotypes, “Impressions of New Zealand”.  Resident of both the Long Beach Peninsula and New Zealand, Powell is constantly exploring new ways, mediums and subject matter. Her most recent art endeavors involve her passion and fascination with printmaking. Attend the reception held for Astoria’s Second Saturday Artwalk, from 5 – 8 pm, May 14th. The artwork will remain on display through May 31st.

Powell has been an artist on the Long Beach Peninsula for many years.  After a 19 year high school teaching career, she now devotes full time to creating prints, oils, and mixed media work. Having grown up in a semi-rural environment of the Pacific Northwest, she has always been drawn to the outdoors and the natural world and incorporated the scenes and feelings of the coast and its natural flora and fauna into her paintings and prints. Eventually, this carried over into her work in New Zealand, where she has been a part-time resident for many years. Working independently at the Te Kowhai Print Trust in the township of Whangarei, Powell produced her newest series of monotypes where native plants have actually been “embossed” into the paper, leaving the lovely textures and shapes of the plant images on each piece.

RiverSea Gallery is open daily at 1160 Commercial Street, call 503-325-1270, or visit the website at www.RiverSeaGallery.com.

The Motherhood Show at CB Gallery

Lady Takes the Stairs

Lady Takes the Stairs by Sophia Pfaff-Shalmiyev

Northwest artists Nikki McClure, Liz Haley and Sophia Pfaff-Shalmiyev are the featured artists presented in The Motherhood Show exhibited through the May at the Cannon Beach Gallery.  The Motherhood Show highlights the dynamic artistic abilities of the three women who all have ties to the DIY (do-it-yourself) art movement of Olympia, Washington.  A celebration of the ultimate act of creation, the Motherhood Show is also an exploration of how women continue to develop their careers as artists after having children.

In celebration of this exhibit, art patrons are encouraged to come into the gallery during the month of May and ask for the “Mother’s Discount,” which is 10% off of any purchase for anyone with a mother (that should cover you, dear reader).

Girl in Lake

Source by Nikki McClure

The most well known artist of the group, Nikki McClure, creates intricate paper-cut illustrations that celebrate the grace of everyday domestic scenes and nature.  McClure’s work appears nationally in books, an annual calendar, cards and posters.  McClure will be showing 14 original paper-cuts in the Motherhood Show.

A recent transplant to Cannon Beach, Oregon; Sophia Pfaff-Shalmiyev has quickly become involved in the northern Oregon Coast’s burgeoning art scene.  An active gallery docent at the Cannon Beach Gallery, Pfaff-Shalmiyev has been in many of the galleries recent juried shows.  She is also a member of Astoria’s Lightbox Photographic, where she has been doing the majority of her darkroom work for her “Your Love Will Break My Heart,” series of autobiographical photographs, writing, and mixed media works.

A self described, “bicoastal feminist artist,” Pfaff-Shalmiyev calls New York City home as well as Cannon Beach, Oregon. Born in Russia in 1978, Pfaff-Shalmiyev immigrated to New York City in 1990 and then attended college at the Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. In Olympia, she deepened her interest in feminist politics and art, joined bands, wrote fanzines and curated art shows that explored the validity of confessional and confrontational narrative.

Space Homestead

Space Homestead by Liz Haley

“Expected to hide our disappointment, and unable to name the void that aspects of mothering can create in other parts of our lives, the artist asks herself if “things” have gotten “better” for women, “ Pfaff-Shalmiyev explained.

“The friendships and the body you remember are gone, but somehow no amount of humiliation and alienation could make the tugs on your heartstrings feel any less magical,” continued Pfaff-Shalmiyev.

Inspired by the many women she has met since moving to Cannon Beach, Pfaff-Shalmiyev aims to capture the ecstatic joy and the humbling vulnerability explored in her images for the Motherhood Show.

Another recent transplant to the coast, Liz Haley is living in Seaside, Oregon with her young family. Born as the youngest of six children in 1972, Haley is equally inspired by the concepts of community and escape.  An artist, filmmaker, musician and curator, Haley’s work has been widely exhibited, including at the Anthology of Film Archive, New York; the Miami Museum of Contemporary Art, and the Center of Contemporary Art, Seattle.  In 2005, she co-founded Valentines, an art, music and performance space in Old Town, Portland, Oregon.

The Cannon Beach Gallery is located at 1064 S. Hemlock St. 503-436-0744 or go to www.cannonbeacharts.org.

2011 Oregon Legislative Session

Betsy Johnson and colleaguesA K-12 budget no one likes, a highway renamed for a man everyone respected, and a legislative process that may drive everyone crazy. Welcome back to the . . .

The Biggest Deal: K-12 Budget
In April, the Senate and House passed, and Gov Kitzhaber signed, the K-12 budget (SB 5552). The $5.7 billion budget is, agrees every member of the Legislature, far short of adequate. But, as Sen Betsy Johnson put it, “We don’t have enough money to fund everyone at the level they think is optimal.” The Senate voted 30-0 for the bill, an extraordinary feat according to Johnson.

The vote in the House was 32-28; each caucus undoubtedly agreed who would vote for and against the budget. The bill had to pass — too much was riding on the need to pass this budget early, including continuing a good working relationship with both the Senate and the Governor — but as members on both sides of the aisle as possible were allowed to vote No. Rep Deborah Boone was one who either choose, or agreed, to vote Yes. Her statement on voting Yes was almost identical to that of Rep Brad Witt: this is the money we have, and it’s not enough. But she will also be supporting efforts of House Dems to tap more reserve funds for schools, an effort Witt also supports.

Sometimes the politics forces these kinds of results: Witt and Boone are in agreement on the K-12 Budget, but it was her duty, or choice, to vote to pass the bill.

IN OTHER LEGISLATIVE BUSINESS…
Even after the passage of the K-12 budget, which represents about one-quarter of the state’s spending from the General Funding, budget matters dominate. The state’s massive budget gap, approximately $3.5 billion short of what would be needed to fund existing programs at existing levels (with inflation), means that policy matters won’t necessarily pass on merit; everything will be scrutinized in unprecedented ways through the lens of funding.

Johnson, who sits on the budget-writing Ways and Means Committee said, “We are going to be doing inhumane budgets” in human services. The state, she said, may be pushing cuts to health providers of up to 19%. “A facility like Clatsop Care is in jeopardy; conceivably the hospital is in jeopardy,” she said. Witt explained that for rest of budget, “much of this is a zero-sum game … we can’t spend the same dollar twice.”  To exacerbate the problem, he said, many of the cuts will lead to the loss of matching federal funds: a $1 cut grows to potentially to a $6 or $7 loss.

All three local representatives are continuing work on both legislation and constituent service. Johnson noted the recent damage to the dock at the City of Warrenton Wauna Mill and her efforts to coordinate with state agencies to move repairs forward as quickly as possible. Witt spoke about bills moving through the legislative process regarding jobs, noting efforts in alternative energy and fuels using biomass and even recycling of plastic. He also has a bill that would make the possession and sale of shark fins in Oregon illegal, a ground-breaking bill that attacks the cruel practice of shark-finning (cutting off the fins and then returning the maimed fish back into the sea to slowly die).

Boone had a number of legislative successes, including a bill to fix a hole in the worker compensation that had removed podiatric care from the list of approved treatments; extending the sunset on wave energy rules beyond 2022; and a series of bills that are moving forward as amendments to other bills. These include bills on dangerous operation of ATVs and an animal abuser registry.

Finally, the House passed HB 3354 unanimously: this will rename a portion of Highway 30 between St Helens and Rainier in honor of slain Police Chief Ralph Painter; the Senate will act on this bill in early May.

MAY
On May 12th, the State Economist will release the “May Forecast” and, at that point, all remaining budget bills will begin to scramble for final funding. A positive forecast won’t mean a sudden flood of money; even the rosiest forecast will still be relatively grim for the state. More likely is that additional funds would be released from reserves with the assurance those will be recovered via economic improvements. And the fact that the Leg will be back in session next February means they can provide necessary adjustments to the 2011-13 budget at that time.

Meanwhile, as the month moves along, committees will struggle to hear as many bills as possible, to pass the most vital, and to try to avoid politically damaging votes. That won’t be easy. On May 11th, for example, the House Rules committee will hold a public hearing on Tuition Equity, allowing undocumented residents to attend Oregon colleges and pay in-state tuition. If that gets to the House floor, a lot of Representatives are going to be facing a volatile decision.


GOOD BILLS MOVING TO THE SENATE

Bill to link Community Colleges and Universities
A bill that creates a clear path for students to transfer between community colleges and universities passed the Oregon House unanimously. HB 3251, championed by Representative Val Hoyle (D-West Eugene/Junction City), earlier received unanimous support in both the Higher Education and Education Committees.  The bill makes it easier to transfer credits from community colleges to universities, said Hoyle.

Buy Oregon First Bill – HB 3000
HB 3000 allows state agencies to choose Oregon goods when bidding out contracts.  The House passed HB 3000, the Buy Oregon First Bill.  The bill, chief sponsored by Representative Brian Clem (D-Salem) and Representative Ben Cannon (D-SE Portland), allows state agencies to give preference to goods and services produced in Oregon when bidding out contracts.

“Oregon government purchases a lot of goods and services.  We should be buying Oregon products first. We think as many of these products as possible should be purchased from small businesses within our state, particularly when the price of those products is very similar. This bill allows Oregon companies to take advantage of the state’s purchasing power to grow their businesses and create more Oregon jobs,” said Rep. Clem.

Oregon House Passes Bottle Bill Update – HB 1036
An improvement to Oregon’s iconic Bottle Bill passed out of the House on a 47-12 vote.

“Just a shade over 40 years ago, this chamber passed HB 1036, Oregon’s Bottle Bill,” said bill sponsor Rep. Ben Cannon (D – Portland). “It turned out to be one of the most effective recycling tools ever devised, but it’s showing signs of age. Today’s vote helps bring the Bottle Bill into the 21st Century.”

HB 3145 updates the Bottle Bill by expanding the system to include containers for most juice, tea, and sports/energy drinks, no later than January 1, 2017.

The bill also encourages the development of a robust system of redemption centers, which will maintain consumer convenience while improving the redemption experience. It creates an incentive for the beverage industry to keep the redemption rate high. Only if redemption rates fall below 80% after 2016 would the deposit increase to 10 cents per container.

North Head Lighthouse Benefit Concert with Radio Cowboy

Radio CowboyThe North Head lighthouse is in need of restoration.  For 113 years, this iconic tower has stood watch on the northwestern headland of Cape Disappointment.  As the primary, outer coast lighthouse it has served to guide mariners safely into the mouth of the Columbia River.  Over the years, the marches of time and the elements have left their indelible marks on the lighthouse, and now its service to us must be returned.  The North Head lighthouse needs our help.

The Keepers of the North Head Lighthouse formed in 2009 to insure a steadfast vigil and sound legacy for the lighthouse.  The Keepers have been promoting awareness, raising publicity and spearheading the movement to restore the North Head lighthouse.

SATURDAY, MAY 14TH, the Keepers host musical trio, RADIO COWBOY, at the Columbia-Pacific Heritage Museum in Ilwaco, WA.  All proceeds from the concert will go to the restoration of North Head. 7pm, $10.00 suggested donation.  Refreshments will be provided and also available by donation.

RADIO COWBOY includes national FROGTOWN recording and touring artist Heather Christie, Emmy-Winning musician Philip Pelletier, and San Francisco based singer/songwriter David Miottel. Radio Cowboy combines sounds inspired by artists like Joni Mitchell, Rickie Lee Jones, Gillian Welch, Counting Crows, Emmy Lou Harris, Mark Knopfler and Dead Can Dance, creating a harmony loaded, atmospheric twang that everyone enjoys.

FMI: Steve Wood, Cape Disappointment State Park, (360) 642-3029, lcic@parks.wa.gov.

United Paws Offers New Program: “A Trip to Snip!”

Kitty

In addition to regular financial assistance to low-income residents for their cats and dogs and to the caregivers of feral cats, United Paws of Tillamook is adding a new service thanks to a north county veterinarian.  The most effective way for United Paws to spend supporter donations is to have what are called “clinics,” when at least one veterinarian performs spay/neuter surgeries all day.  United Paws is now able to hold such clinics approximately once a month for the pets of the economically disadvantaged and for those residents who care for feral cats.  Regardless of income, anyone wishing to help feral cats may take advantage of this service.  Trapping assistance and humane traps may be available, depending on volunteer and trap availability.  In addition, if clients cannot take their cat or dog to the clinic, because they cannot drive or do not have access to transportation, volunteers will pick up and transport the animals to the clinic, then back home again.

Each clinic will focus on one part of the county: south, central, or north.  United Paws is therefore calling upon all low-income residents with dogs or cats in need of spaying or neutering and all residents feeding feral cats who haven’t been sterilized to call the United Paws hotline and leave a message to make a reservation for an upcoming clinic: (503) 842-5663.

Not just spay and neuter
In addition to spay/neuter surgery, cats and dogs will receive pain medication and, if necessary, antibiotics.  Cats will receive mandated inoculations as well as flea and ear mite treatment; and they’ll be wormed.  Dogs will receive a distemper vaccination and will be wormed if necessary.  Rabies inoculations for either dogs or cats are the responsibility of the owner or caretaker.

Payment
“A Trip to Snip!” is not free.  United Paws will work with clients to establish an affordable fee, due when the client delivers the animal to the clinic or when the animal is picked up by volunteers.  This is to ensure appointments are kept.  The veterinarian is giving up one of his free days, so United Paws must ensure his time isn’t wasted as a result of no-shows.  Another reason United Paws must ask for payment toward this service is that all funds to carry out United Paws’ programs are raised by volunteers through private donations from the general public, grants, fundraising events, and adoption fees.  Volunteers receive no compensation, not even for gas.  United Paws receives no financial support from the county or any national group, and not one cent goes to salaries.  United Paws endeavors to get the most out of every dollar, and “A Trip to Snip!” guarantees that.  The more clients using this service can pay, the more United Paws can help others who also need the program.

Successful history
United Paws has been operating and offering critical animal services in Tillamook County since 2003. To date, United Paws has spayed and neutered more than 4,650 county cats and dogs who would not otherwise have been sterilized.  The group has thereby reduced the number of unwanted and abandoned animals, as well as alleviated and prevented animal suffering as a result of homelessness.  Since January 1, 2011, United Paws has sterilized more than 280 cats and dogs.

Emergency care
In addition to spay/neuter services, United Paws also runs Annie’s Emergency Fund to provide veterinary care for those animals in immediate need of help, such as to treat pain resulting from a traffic accident.  In 2010, United Paws paid more than $61,000 to local veterinarians to cover spay/neuter and emergency services.

Exploring Our Oceans: The Mysteries of the Tides and Tidepool Life

BootsA new temporary exhibit opens at the Cannon Beach History Center

The Cannon Beach History Center and Museum will host a dedication reception and lecture for the new temporary exhibit “Exploring our Oceans: the Mysteries of the Tides and Tidepool Life” on Wednesday, May 11, at 7 p.m.

Donna Lenius, Haystack Rock Awareness Program (HRAP) Marine Educator and Volunteer Coordinator, will explore the vibrant world between the tides and the extravagant wildlife visitors can see in the intertidal zone in her lecture “A Walk in the Tidepools: A Glimpse of the Ocean.”

The dedication reception will begin at 7 p.m., and will feature wine and refreshments. The reception will allow attendees a chance to view the exhibit, which was produced in partnership with HRAP and features historical artifacts, photography, and sea life specimens from tidepools.

From 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Lenius will examine what lives in the tidepools, the great lengths that life goes to exist there, and how the tidepool ecosystem is translated into a classroom.

This event is free and open to the public. Call 503-436-9301 for more information, or visit www.cbhistory.org.

Garage Sale

The Cannon Beach Women’s Auxiliary, American Legion, will hold their annual Garage Sale on SATURDAY MAY 21ST, 2011, from 9am to 4pm. The Sale is held at the Legion Hall in Mid-town.  This sale features lamps, furniture, bedding, kitchen wares, holiday decorations, books and much more.  Sorry, no clothing, shoes or large appliances.

Anyone wishing to donate to the sale can bring items to the Legion Hall on Thursday or Friday, May l9th and 20th, for sorting and pricing.

Funds from the sale help the Legion Auxiliary to contribute to local high school scholarships, veterans hospitals, Xmas baskets and other community activities.

Tillamook Estuaries Partnership Hosts: 8th Annual Bounty of the Bay Fundraiser and Fishing Tournament

Fishing enthusiasts gather JUNE 3-4,  for the Annual Tillamook Estuaries Partnership (TEP) Bounty on the Bay.  Now in its eighth year, Bounty on the Bay has become one of the most anticipated spring events for anglers on the North Coast.

This weekend event highlights the best Tillamook Bay has to offer: amazing scenery, humongous fish, great local food, and jovial company. Now an anticipated tradition, Bounty on the Bay features two days of revelry: kicking off on Friday night with a Dinner and Salmon Fishing Demonstration, featuring tips that are bound to come in handy during Saturday’s Premier Fishing Tournament, and the grande finale: a sumptuous Seafood Feast (with fish donated by long time supporter Pacific Seafood and Oyster), Awards Ceremony, and Silent Auction.

Both events take place at the historic Old Mill in Garibaldi. TEP is proud to present local pros John Kirby and Bob Rees who will lead the Salmon Fishing Demo on Friday night during the BBQ Pork Dinner, followed by our esteemed guest speaker, Jim Martin (former Chief of Fisheries, ODFW) on Saturday night. This year is not just for the fishermen- those interested in a different bay adventure can participate in a guided kayak tour of the Garibaldi harbor.  This action-packed weekend will raise vital funds to support TEP’s local grant program that encourages research, habitat restoration, and education projects throughout Tillamook County.

Registration is open and necessary for all facets of the event.

Please register by May 31st!  Registration forms are available online by going to www.tbnep.org or, to obtain more information regarding the event, contact Sierra Lauder by phone at (503) 322-2222 or by email at bounty@tbnep.org.

This annual fundraiser supports TEP’s efforts to implement the Tillamook Bay Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (CCMP).

Local Fare — Feeding Us All

Head Start with Starts
Glimpses of blue sky and sun gets coastal residents chomping at the bit to get outside and begin gardening. But as long-timers know, the chance of a significant frost in May is high—so patience is not only a necessity but a virtue. Later planting with starts is one way to mitigate the wait, and fortunately the Lower Nehalem Community Trust’s Community Garden Program is hosting a sale of organic veggie starts proven for the NW Maritime climate. The sale is on Saturday May 14, from 9am to noon at the Alder Creek Farm.  Greens, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, squashes, tomatoes, herbs and more are will be ready for adoption into your own garden.

“Proceeds from the sale will help with the ongoing improvements to our greenhouse and gardens,” says Karen Matthews, LNCT’s Community Garden manager.   “We continually upgrade our garden practices which allow our productivity to flourish.   The more our garden grows, the more fresh organic produce we can donate to the North County Community Food Bank.” Essential, as food banks continue to see exponential rise in demand, especially for fresh and nutritious foods.

LNCT’s community garden is another avenue to local food access and food security. The 25 active gardeners share the work and harvest of food from the ½ acre garden. Other ways to get involved in the Trust include membership; a 4 in. plant start can be yours with a commitment to get involved.
Annual membership in the LNCT begins at just $15 and includes benefits such as reduced admission and tuition to events, programs, and workshops.

To reach Alder Creek Farm & Natural Area, turn south off of Hwy 101 at Underhill Lane between Manzanita and Nehalem.  Follow the Lane to the end of the road for plenty of free parking. Tel: 503-368-3203 Email: lnct@nehalemtel.net. Web: www.nehalemtrust.org.

Growin’ A Row
Growing a garden this year? Food Roots of Tillamook County is encouraging local gardeners to plant an extra row or bed for donation to the hungry. No donation is too small or large, and neighbors or friends can team up to make a bigger impact. The usual suspects of carrots, onions, squash, peppers, beets, and so on are popular, but lesser-known plants are welcome too. Produce should be in good, edible shape and it is appreciated if it is field washed.

There are two ways to donate: bring the food to the Regional Food Bank of Tillamook County at 2105 Fourth St. in Tillamook; or take your produce directly to a food pantry, soup kitchen or other community program. For a list of these programs call The Regional Food Bank at 503-842-3154 x1 or x4.
Spread the word about the Grow a Row program, and help increase access to high quality local food. For more info about the program, contact Food Roots. Tel: 503-842-3154 x2 Email: info@foodrootsnw.org

Postals Packin’ Peas
May 14 is the day of the world’s largest one-day food drive, and everyone with a mailbox (and without, for that matter) is invited to participate. More than 4,000 letter carriers in urban and rural areas throughout Oregon and Clark County, WA will join with letter carriers across America to collect donations of nonperishable food from their postal customers during the National Association of Letter Carriers Food Drive, Saturday, May 14.

The Run down:
1. Look for a white, plastic, degradable food drive bag in your mail during the first week of May.
Fill the bag (or any sturdy bag) with nutritious, nonperishable food. The Oregon Food Bank Network will recycle your bag.

2. Place it by your mailbox early on Saturday, May 14.

3. All donated food stays in the community where it was collected. Letter carriers will collect nonperishable food donations left by mailboxes and take them to their local post office, where more than a thousand volunteers throughout Oregon and Clark County will pack the food. Trucks will pick up the food and deliver it to regional food banks of the Oregon Food Bank Network. If you miss your letter carrier’s daily visit, drop off your food donations at any post office by Wednesday, May 18.

Foods to donate:
canned meats (tuna, chicken, salmon),
canned and boxed meals (soup, chili, stew, macaroni and cheese),
canned or dried beans and peas (black, pinto, lentils),
pasta, rice cereal,
canned fruits, 100 percent fruit juice (canned, plastic or boxed),
canned vegetables,
cooking oil, boxed baking mixes.

Avoid the Obvious:
Rusty or unlabeled cans, glass containers, perishable items, homemade items, noncommercial canned or packaged items, alcoholic beverages, mixes or soda, open or used items.

Up-Beet Shopping Up Wahkiakum Way
Two Island’s Farm Market began their sixth season Friday, May 6th at Stockhouse’s Farm, 59 W. Birnie Slough Road on Puget Island.  Market hours have been extended and will run Fridays from 3-6:30 pm through October.  Fresh Wahkiakum grown vegetables, cut flowers, veggie starts (23 varieties of tomato plants), perennials, artisan breads, free-range eggs, and USDA processed meats (goat, beef, lamb and pork) by the cut are often available.  Market booths will accept Senior Farmers Market Checks and SNAP cards this season.  The Up-Beet Stage is ready for a new season with an Open Mic—all musicians welcome—3-6:30–a great sound system will amplify your talents!  The Chief Wahkiakum trolley will run shoppers from the Elochoman Marina to the Farmers Market, leaving the marina at 3, 4 and 5 pm on Fridays (weather permitting). Contact Rob or Diane Stockhouse, Tel: 360.849.4145, or the Wahkiakum Chamber for more info, Tel: 360-795-9996.

Colleen Raney

COLLEEN RANEY is recognized as one of the finest singers in the Northwest Irish music scene. Grown on traditional Irish culture, singing and dancing with both her family and the respected ensemble Magical Strings.  Now based in Portland, Oregon, Raney fronts a powerhouse group of Northwest Irish musicians including mandolin whiz Zak Borden and guitarist Casey Neill.  She brings a voice that to reach to the back of the pub, a band to bring you to your feet, and a love for the poetry of Irish song.

Raney’s debut album Linnet is produced by Hanz Araki and recorded by Ezra Holbrook  (The Minus 5, The Decemberists, Dr. Theopolis).  Gathering a veritable who’s who of celtic music.

Sunday, May 22, 8pm, Fort George Brewery in Astoria, NO Cover.

Colleen Raney

CORNMEAL

CornmealA high-energy bluegrass quintet steeped in American roots and folk music. Cornmeal has been going strong for ten years, with three albums under their belt and the stage shared with many a national act – this is the band, if you could pick, to play at your hootenanny!!

Friday , May 20, 7-10pm at the Sand Trap in Gearhart, NO Cover.

Basin Street N.W.

Basin Street NWOKAY. LIVE Jazz at the Bridgewater Bistro in Astoria, every Thursday night. Chuck Wilder pianist, Dave Drury, guitar and Todd Pederson on bass. 6:30 – 8:30pm. Wine, dine, aps . . . and groove.  NO coincidence, 20 Basin St.

Buffalo Death Beam

Buffalo Death Beam

HAILING FROM Pullman, WA, Buffalo Death Beam is an eclectic mix of modern, folk-inspired melodies with eerily beautiful harmonies. The blend of acoustic riffs with violin, banjo, mandolin and piano create a striking back drop to stunning vocals and inventive lyrics.  With a large local following and a dedicated fan base, The Inlander, a weekly entertainment publication out of Spokane, WA, called them, “The best kept secret in the Palouse.”

Sunday, May 15, 8pm, Fort George Brewery in Astoria,  NO Cover.

The Dixie Swim Club at the Coaster

FIVE SOUTHERN WOMEN, whose friendships began many years ago on their college swim team, set aside a long weekend every August to recharge those relationships. Free from husbands, kids and jobs, they meet at the same beach cottage on North Carolina’s Outer Banks to catch up, laugh and meddle in each other’s lives. “The Dixie Swim Club” focuses on four of those weekends and spans a period of thirty-three years.

As their lives unfold and the years pass, these women increasingly rely on one another, through advice and raucous repartee, to get through the challenges (men, sex, marriage, parenting, divorce, aging) that life flings at them.  And when fate throws a wrench into one of their lives in the second act, these friends, proving the enduring power of ‘teamwork’, rally ‘round their own with the strength and love that takes this comedy in a poignant and surprising direction.

Performances: May 6 – May 29. Friday & Saturday evenings at 8pm. Sunday matinees at 3pm May 8, 22, & 29.Thursday, May 26 at 8pmTickets: $20 & $15.Talkback Thursday: May 12 at 7:30. Informal Q & A with cast and director following the performance (special ticket price: adults: $14; students: $8.) Call the Coaster Theater to reserve, 108 N. Hemlock, 503.436.1242.

THE ERUPTION

“Lets blow the lid off. People don’t want to talk about [it]. There is so much going on in world today.  Its time for more expression.  And we have to get it out.” – Marco.

THE ERUPTIONMarco Davis is talking about his inspiration for a show coming up, its called THE ERUPTION. Have you heard about? If it’s after May 14 – and you didn’t take in the performance, I hope you get a second chance.

Something new. Can there be anything new? Always. Like this; last couple months, Wednesday and Thursday nights at about 10pm, 17 people come together to rehearse dance numbers, cabaret vignettes, pull themselves together, find the mojo, the steps, and probably “some balls” to boot.

A small percentage of this troupe might be packing some dance background, but for the most part, no. But what they do share is a common desire for expression. Davis choreographs the numbers, and the top, inside expectation is . . . get your own and give it out. It works. Beautifully.

Many know Mark (Marco) Davis as the charming and talented #2 Chef at the Columbian Café. Second only to the master, Uriah Hulsey who is now spending time outside the café – putting Davis in the role as “the go to chef.”

Native Astorian, Davis is also an icon in another realm – that of theater and dance. For years he’s been inspiring people to give it their all, involved in many projects.

A generously hearted teacher, Davis teaches jazz, tap, and that extra something that puts the bounce in your shoe.

Davis left the area for a number of years, completing a master in dance at U of O, and teaching dance in NYC. He came back to the home roots not so long ago. On his 40th Birthday – he threw an outrageous, staged karaoke party at the Columbian Theater, using film, lip sync, asking friends to come up and perform. It was so much fun, people asked, “When are you doing it again?”

Thus, THE EVENT was spawned. This last January, Davis got a little more serious, adding dance numbers with lots of people in them. It was campy, energetic, sexy, and the crowds had a helluva good time.

Come THE ERUPTION. More developed. The dancers, more confident. The dance numbers, complex yet performed with ease, with ooze, with spice and dice. More campy vignettes, guaranteed to entertain. That’s all I’m sayin’. It’s late night entertainment.

We’ve missed the Rocky Horror Picture Show since it’s run at the River. Relax, and get ready to do the time warp again.

Saturday, May 14. Doors open 9:30. Show at 10pm. Grab a cocktail at the Voodoo Lounge. $5 bucks at the door. 21 & Over. Columbian Theater in Astoria.