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TREEMORIAM: Fallen Cedar November 2013

cedar treemoriam


TREEMORIAM.
This December issue marks the introduction of a new segment in HIPFiSH. Throughout the life path we spend most of our time developing relationships – their beginnings, transformations, endings. Relationships to other; whether it is to fellow human, to our work, to spirituality, where we live, to animals, to nature, all exercise and deepen the human journey.

And so to this concept, in ensuing issues we honor relationship to tree, as unique a relationship as any. One that has inspired poems, paintings, songs, in addition to what the tree has bestowed to human survival and culture, in its infinite manifestations. The tree, one of earth’s most generous gifts to humankind, to say nothing of its tremendous function on the planet.

Whether loss to blow down, development, trunk rot, in or out of personal control, TREE- MORIAM pays homage to the end of the rooted friend. If you would like to share a tree memoriam, or just let us know of a tree/s demise, please contact hipfish@charter.net.
– Dinah Urell

We thank Astoria resident Jessamyn Grace for sharing this personal story:

As a glorious November morning began to unravel in dappled sunlight I abruptly awoke to the baneful sound of chainsaws. I ran downstairs and collapsed, sobbing upon realizing that my neighbor was dismantling my favorite cedar tree. It was over 100 years old, a wise and knowing guardian outside my window. The eagles took rest upon it, the owls surveyed the land atop of it, and the mirthful crows protected it. None of them have since come to visit.

cedar downI recognize the misguided temptation to blame, but I must add that my neighbors are kind people and I don’t criticize them at all – they cut down the tree to build a fort for their children. My relationship with the cedar was my own and I cannot expect others to share this sentiment – in fact, some may find it comical or bizarre. When I moved to Astoria 7 years ago I didn’t know anyone, and it was a couple of years before I made any close friends. I tell you in earnest that this cedar was my companion – I would sit for hours in her majestic shadow as I watched the boats go by. I feared for her during our coastal storms – breathing a sigh of gratitude when she made it through. We survived so much together – she mirrored my experience here and we thrived on the silence that is Astoria.

Along with my thoughts I gathered her fallen branches in the yard, burying my face in the scent while the sap still ran in sorrowful recognition of its fate. I spent the day walking along the river so I wouldn’t have to be near when she fatally fell. I dreaded returning home, and I have yet to sit in my reading chair by the window knowing she will not be there. I phoned my parents as the sun began to set, my mother comforting me saying that ‘even though it will get better you will always miss your friend’. My mother understands me, understands that cedar’s roots are my roots in this place where the river meets the sea.


Soils and Slope Relationships in Astoria – A Concern by Art Limbird

I have great reservations about the apparent need/desire to develop certain parts of Astoria for residential and even commercial use on sloping land poorly suited to such development.

I call attention to city land to the west of 3rd off Niagara and Madison on the ‘south slope’ – land that currently is forested. To me, there are good reasons why this land has not been developed and is forested. The unstable slope conditions are vulnerable to the weight of buildings and roads and it appears that landslips have occurred in the area in the past. Looking at the west side of this same area, there are truncated streets such as Alameda, Denver and Clatsop that help to substantiate the instability. Selling this land for residential development may prove to be a costly mistake.

In fact, there is evidence that many parts of Astoria are affected by naturally unstable slopes, made more hazardous by so-called development. Cutting into the base of slopes, adding weight to slopes with homes, other buildings, roads, etc., and ‘lubricating’ these slopes via watered lawns and disturbed drainage patterns compound the mechanisms of slope failure.

Since I have lived in the area – about 9 years – there have been several examples of slope movement and instability:

• near Safeway [about 31st and franklin] where the slope base was compromised for intended stores – now ‘shored-up’ by large rock rip-rap

• homes upslope from Astoria high school on Waldorf Circle which slid and cracked open – apparently affected by ‘activities’ at the slope base behind the school

• on-going subtle slumping on niagara ave. Just east of 15th around the corner from the ‘slide area’ sign

• significant landslide on bond street that has diverted water and sewer lines, etc.  [check back to 1953-54 to see the major landslides in this same area!!]

Note: I was interviewed by a Portland TV reporter just after the bond street slide but the interview did not appear on TV. I believe my comment that ‘much of Astoria is vulnerable to landslides’ was too much to handle in a short news clip!

• most recent slide on Duane Street west of 8th that is threatening several downslope houses and has created a very steep slope

• several abandoned and un-inhabitable homes around the ‘rim’ of the north and west sides of Astoria hills due to land movements nearby

In addition, there are many locations throughout Astoria where there are steep concave-shaped slopes = back slope of a ‘fault’ or ‘slump block’ and land slip and the downslope ‘debris pile’ of slumped material. In fact, much of Astoria was built on the slump material from the 1700 earthquake and tsunami.  This material now is described as ‘colluvium’ in the Clatsop County soil survey report.  Colluvium is “the material [also called talus] which accumulates at the base of a slope”. Most of Astoria sits on ‘rotted’ mudstone that is loosened and ready to move even on gentle slopes.

The article in the Daily Astorian of October 18, 2013 “landslide maps signal alert for Astoria” seems to be ignored in the interest of selling off lands. However, a ‘pairing’ of site observations and soil mapping can determine which slopes are more vulnerable and which slopes are safer.  The combination of soil landscape [topography], plus slope aspect, plus soil ‘parent material’ will provide the answer – safe or sorry development location.

Note: my qualifications are: soil geographer with 30+ years of research and field experience in soil characteristics and formation. I have worked with soil properties, soil erosion, soils related to land movements, and buried soils. I have worked in Ohio, Alberta, St. Vincent, and Jamaica on soil/land use reports and projects. Now I am working with the North Coast Land Conservancy and the willapa bay national wildlife reserve with soil related projects.

Respectfully submitted,

Dr. Arthur Limbird
Associate Professor Emeritus
University of Calgary


OPEN LETTER TO ASTORIA CITY COUNCIL by Shel Cantor

DATE: November 26, 2013
SUBJECT: Planned sale of city-owned, vacant land
FROM: Shel Cantor

SUMMARY:
At the October 18 City Council meeting, during the public comment session regarding the City of Astoria Property Sales Program, I and other citizens asked why our city is now selling off vacant land. In my presentation, I quoted numbers from the county tax assessor’s office that indicate land prices in Astoria are at their lowest level in eight years and are likely to increase in the near future. After the public comment session was closed, Mayor Van Dusen and City Councilors addressed this Why Now issue. We were not permitted to immediately respond to what we heard. I offer my rebuttal here.

I explain below that the responses from the Mayor and City Counselors Warr, Mellin, and LaMear were not substantive, and none justified any urgency for this Sales Program. In the absence of urgency, is this recently initiated, rapid sell off of a large fraction of the city’s vacant lots consistent with best-practices of financial management? — especially in today’s market conditions, and considering that you will flood the market and thereby further depress the prices of the land you are trying to sell off. Note: as of November 26, 2014, at the Clatsop Association of Realtors web site, there were 41 vacant properties listed for sale in all of Astoria; compared with the city’s 1300 properties, 37 of which you designated for just the first group of this sell off. Moreover, you are selling land presently serving as a contingency fund for the city. These assets would be sorely missed if, unlike today, a truly urgent need befalls our city in the future. It would be advisable to request a written, legal opinion from City Attorney Henningsgaard assessing your compliance with your fiduciary responsibilities and potential personal liability exposure on these counts.

Councilor Herzig stated during the meeting that after consideration of all arguments, he rescinded his support for this Sales Program. Later in the meeting, he was the lone vote against approval. I urge the rest of you to reconsider your approval. I recommend (further below) changes to this Sales Program that would be more beneficial for Astoria residents and would manage these city assets more responsibly. The changes would also inhibit handing over our city’s vacant land to developers, speculators, and those who wish to buy the land only to sell off its trees; which is what the Sales Program you approved will primarily do.

DISCUSSION:
Responding to the Why Now issue, Mayor Van Dusen asked each member of the Council to explain why s/he had voted (in January 2014) to set a goal of selling off land.

Mayor Van Dusen began, stating his objective was to increase the number of residents of Astoria (via housing being built on vacant lots) to spread out the cost of utilities among more users, and thereby reduce utility rates. Regardless of how realistic it is to assume that “if you build it, they will come,” the Mayor’s objective would equally apply in past and future years. Therefore, it does not justify urgency.
Incidentally, there were 4980 housing units in Astoria as of 2010, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. How many new, occupied housing units would need to be added via this sell off in order to achieve a significant reduction in utility rates?

Councilor Warr stated his objective was to reduce city costs to maintain these properties. This objective would equally apply to past and future years, also. It, too, does not justify urgency.

Beyond that, Councilor Warr did not indicate how much savings of city maintenance expenditures would be achieved by this sell off. On page 1 of the document “City of Astoria, Adopted Budget, Year Beginning July 1, 2013,” dated July 1, 2013, the entire, “Total Expenditures” line item for Parks Operation – Maintenance (which includes more than maintaining just these lots) is 5% of the city’s total “projected gross resources” ($457 thousand out of just under $9 Million) for the current fiscal year (p. iv). I could not find a breakout within that budget for maintaining vacant lots, let alone those lots designated for sale. Vacant (mostly forested) land does not require much maintenance. Our city is clearly not spending any appreciable fraction of its resources maintaining the vacant lots designated for sale.

Counselor Mellin stated her objective was to provide resources for the city’s capital improvement fund, needed for purchases such as police vehicles. However, according to that same budget document (pages iv-v), city staff are projecting a $190,350 balance in that capital improvement fund at the end of the current fiscal year (90% more than last year), and that projection already includes $61,000 allocated for buying three public service vehicles. Again, this objective is an unconvincing justification for why NOW.

By the way, moving city-owned vacant land onto the tax rolls in order to increase future city (general fund) revenue is an objective worth weighing against what would be lost in doing so. Yet, the current fiscal year budget for our city is balanced, plus a projected contingency fund of 1.4 million dollars at the end of the year, the same as at the beginning of the year, and this contingency is “18% of budgeted expenditures … [and] remains a sound fund balance.” (p iv, from the budget document referenced above). Here as well, one fails to see urgency.

Counselor LaMear, in her turn, repeated the objective to reduce the cost for maintaining the vacant land, which was rebutted above. She added her hope that this Sales Program would result in neighbors buying adjacent lots for good purposes (e.g., planting gardens). However, if land is designated by the city for sale and the four-week window (during which neighbors must decide whether to write an offer to buy the land) comes at a bad time for someone who would have been a Good-Neighbor for that lot, the property then goes out for “general listing” (as stated in one of City Manager Benoit’s presentation slides). General listing is open to everyone. In stark contrast to Good-Neighbors, developers buy land (preferably at low prices, like now), denude the land, throw up housing units, sell them, and could leave it to others to deal with any resulting, eventual landslides, etc. Speculators buy land at low prices when the market is likely to increase (like now), hang on to the lots for a few years, and then sell the land (usually to developers) at higher prices (which the city could have obtained if not for unjustified urgency). Would-be “mini-timber-barons” buy land at a price below the value of its trees, deforest it, sell off the felled trees for a net profit, and then could walk away (Flavel-like) from the property.

The Sales Program you approved might benefit some Good-Neighbors. I believe, though, ultimately, neighbors and non-neighbors who are developers, speculators, and mini-timber-barons will benefit most (and most often).

PROPOSED CHANGES:
The procedures for this Sales Program can be modified to:
— Comply with your fiduciary responsibilities,
— Encourage Good-Neighbor purchases, and
— Preclude the sell off of city-owned land to developers, speculators, and mini-timber-barons.

Starting with the list of all properties deemed “excess” (as you called them), we could permit the sale of any from that list, at any time, but no more than ten annually. This procedure would be appropriate for good stewardship of city assets, because it would reduce the “investment timing” risk of fetching poor prices in a depressed market (like now), avoid flooding the market (which would further lower prices), and avoid rapidly depleting this important contingency resource of land when there is no urgency for a large sell off at this time. It would also avoid forcing residents to hurriedly use or lose their rights within an arbitrarily chosen, four-week window.

We could permit sales only to those whose primary residence is adjacent to the land they bid on. The bidder would have to agree in the written contract to certain restrictions, including requirements that the purchased lot be immediately combined with the buyer’s own property into a single parcel, and that cutting down trees on the purchased lot would remain subject to the rules currently applied to city-owned lots. This would foster Good-Neighbors while inhibiting anyone, including neighbors, from buying in order to develop, speculate, or make a quick profit by just cutting down trees.

The prices could be set at the most recent “Real Market Value” determined by the county tax assessor (which is available on-line to everyone). And a bid would need prior, written agreement from all other neighbors living on land adjacent to the vacant lot of interest. This would promote transparency, fairness, and the rule of law over the rule of whim.

With procedures like these (and this is not yet a vetted, complete list), there would be no need to hire a real estate broker or administrator to enable these small numbers of transparently specified transactions.

We can do the right thing for our city, if you want to.

ADDENDUM:
The average asking-price for this first group of lots is 55% of their Real Market Value (RMV), as found at the County Tax Assessor’s website. Compare that with the following for privately owned properties on the MLS (the Multiple Listing Service for the open real estate market). There are 3 vacant lots in Astoria on the MLS with AREA Properties as the listing agent, and for which the county posts a RMV. Those 3 lots have an average asking-price that is 97% of their RMV. I also researched the remaining 5 lowest priced Astoria, vacant land, MLS entries, from other realtors. (I chose the lowest priced entries for a fairer comparison to the city lots you are selling.) Those asking-prices averaged 98% of their RMV. So, asking-prices for privately owned properties on the MLS, at least for all the properties I researched, are averaging RMV. Your asking-prices are half their RMV.

When someone wishes to sell real estate, a good real estate agent will ascertain how motivated their client is. If the seller is not in a hurry and wants top dollar, the agent will recommend an asking-price at or above what the market can be expected to bear. Motivated seller? — lower asking-price. Very motivated seller? — lower still. AREA Properties is a professional outfit. Surely they would not have set asking-prices at half RMV without someone who represents our city instructing them that you are desperately motivated to sell our land.


Spend an Evening with the NORTH COAST FOREST COALITION

forest1Celebrate and Play a Part
Friday, November 22, 5PM – 7PM
At KALA – 1017 Marine drive in Astoria

The North Coast State Forest Coalition is a group of 5 non-profit fish and conservation groups working to achieve a balanced management on the Tillamook and Clatsop State Forests—a management that adequately protects fish and wildlife habitat, clean drinking water, and recreation opportunities. We believe that these values should be supported alongside a sustainable timber harvest that supports family-wage jobs and county budgets. Our core members are:

• The Association of Northwest Steelheaders
• The Wild Salmon Center
• The Oregon Chapter, Sierra Club
• Oregon Council, Trout Unlimited
• The Northwest Guides and Anglers Association

These forests are important for providing habitat for the Northwest’s iconic salmon and steelhead runs, a variety of wildlife species, clean drinking water for over 400,000 Oregonians, diverse recreation oppor- tunities (including hiking, biking, camping, hunting, fishing, wildlife viewing and photography), and timber production. Since the Til- lamook Burn, a series of fires from 1933 to 1951 that devastated the landscape, these lands have been in recovery. Recently management has given primacy to timber production over other values and complex forest structure (“old growth”) targets have dropped from 50% of the landscape to 30%. There is consistent pressure from the timber industry and some county commissioners to manage these lands as though they were industrial timber holdings, an approach that would undermine the mandate to manage these lands to provide the “Great- est Permanent Value” to all Oregonians.

The Coalition has organized a broad grassroots effort to engage northwest Oregonians in the State Forest discus- sion. In the past two years, has pushed forward the new “High Value Conservation Area” classification on State Forests, which will apply to approximately 100,000 acres of coastal rainforest. And now, two members of our Coalition have been appointed to the stakeholder group seeking a new Forest Management Plan that will provide financial sta- bility and superior conservation outcomes. Along the way, they’ve led numerous fun and adventurous trips into the forest, held packed public meetings, and brought to light the narrative and plight of these public forests. The next 18 months will see the drafting of a plan that could shape the State Forest landscape for 10+ years, which means they will be engaged more than ever.

forest2

The Photography of Micahel Granger to Proceed NCFC
Co-owner of LightBox Photography Gallery Michael Granger accompanied NCFC this past year, teaching hikers about photography while they learned more about tree conservation. Michael’s forest photography will be on sale at KALA this eve, with proceeds to benefit NCFC. Also view his photography at the November Clatsop Community College show “Connection to Place”.

Success has been citizen-driven and many North Coast residents have played integral roles in these accomplishments. On November 22nd, all are invited to enjoy an early evening of stunning local photography, delicious foods, and conversation about the state of our State Forests. NCFC teams with KALA/HIPFiSHmonthly and Lightbox Photographic to provide folks on the North Coast a relaxing and fun opportunity to celebrate the successes protecting the Tillamook and Clatsop State Forests and to learn about and engage in NCFC future efforts. Oregon Forest Expert, Bob Van Dyk, will provide an update on the state of our North Coast State Forests.

This event is free with food, drinks, and photographs for sale. The evening will be for celebration and discussion.

KALA (Finnish for Fish) eats for the eve
In celebration of our region – rich in trees, mountains, waters, wildlife and heritage of peoples that inhabit its lands – KALA prepares Finnish specialties available for the eve, plus Fort George brews, freshly shaken cocktails and select wines.

What: State Forest Evening with the North Coast State Forest Coalition
Where: KALA Gallery at Hipfish Monthly, 1017 Marine Dr., Astoria, OR 97103
When: 5:00-7:00 pm, November 22nd
Why: We’ve worked hard to create Conservation Areas in our State Forests, let’s celebrate and keep the progress going!
Who: You and everyone you know!

Campaign Coordinator, North Coast State Forest Coalition Office: 503-238-0442 x307
chris.smith.505@gmail.com
Forestlegacy.org
Facebook.com/forestlegacy


Katie No Trees

katie trees

Photo: Don Frank

EVERY SUMMER our Oregon Coast towns are swarmed with visitors. We see them gathered cozily around evening bonfires, frolicking in the ocean, building sand-castles, searching for seashells, and standing in awe of our pink-orange sunsets. These same adoring visitors are hiking our mountain trails under the canopy of huge old-growth trees and abundant greenery. They are walking the banks of our rivers and investigating the array of bird species inhabiting our beaches, estuaries and woods. Millions of dollars are spent every year so that people can escape their traffic jams and concrete to seek renewal in the ocean air. The natural beauty of our own backyard is what many people consider paradise.

katietrees

Photo: Don Frank

As full time residents it is easy to forget the significance of what surrounds us. Katie Trees and her daughter, Ara, are two people who have not forgotten how blessed we are living here on the North Oregon Coast. They moved out of apartment living and into a Seaside home three years ago. The draw of their current residence, tucked back off Wahanna Road, was the natural beauty of the land surrounding it. They were immediately enchanted by the magnificent Cedar, Hemlock, Spruce and Fir trees encircling the neighborhood. Although much of the land comprising their yard is not actually owned by their landlords, they have been caring for the untended land for the last three years. Katie and Ara planted and maintained a variety of ferns, plants, bushes, shrubs, and flowers. They watched the visiting deer munch from the thriving elderberry, huckleberry and blueberry bushes. They lovingly planted an Andromeda tree and an Escallonia shrub. They created a bark-chip pathway weaving around the perimeter of their house so that they could move about the yard in winter without getting muddy.

Their yard was home to a plethora of wildlife. Bird feeders and wind chimes hung from tree branches and a bird bath serviced many a flighty friend. Ara is a photographer. She has been ill and homebound for seven years, and her yard has been a sanctuary, a place of healing and tranquility for her. She has spent hours photographing her wildlife friends. Her protected yard and the forested land surrounding their house provided her with the opportunity to experience the outdoors in a safe and beautiful environment.

fallen tree

Felled tree. One of the older trees in the 1.5 acre demolished urban wood.

THE OWNERS of this abundant and lively land are members of the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Neighboring Tree’s home is one of their Mormon churches. Trees was notified in July of this year by the church elder overseeing the Northwest branch that they needed to enlarge their parking lot from 70 to 143 parking spaces to accommodate their growing congregation. Trees requested that the 20 feet of existing land between the end of her deck and the pre-renovated parking lot – the piece of land that she and her daughter had so faithfully maintained – be left intact as a buffer between her residence and the new parking lot. She also made pleas to save some of the old-growth trees, offering ideas on how to incorporate the trees into the new parking lot. This suggestion was reiterated by Planning Commissioner Tom Horning when the plans were submitted to the council for approval. Horning requested that they adjust their plans in order to save some of the trees. These suggestions were turned down, but Trees’ request to keep her small piece of yard was granted with a promise from the church elder.

In the following weeks Katie and Ara watched as the forested land surrounding their home was bulldozed and trees were uprooted. Within the 1.5 acres of urban wood that was demolished, some of these trees were dated to be 100-years-old after they came down. Most of them were at least 50-years-old. The ground was cleared and preparations were made to pour the concrete. As the women stood watching they noticed that the foreman and workers were careful to stay away from the 20 feet of land that was promised to them. It was clear that the agreement between Trees and the elder had been communicated to the men doing the work. Although it was painful to watch the beloved trees come down, the mother and daughter found comfort in knowing that their 20 feet of yard would be untouched.

before destruction 1Given the promises that were made to her, you can imagine Trees’ shock one afternoon during the demolition when she received a text from her daughter informing her that the 20 feet of buffer land was being destroyed. The trees, plants, ferns, bark-chip path…even the birdbath, were being torn down. Trees rushed home from work at her lunch break to find that everything once living on the 20 feet of land was gone. In her bewilderment she went immediately to the foreman; he told her that he was just following orders. According to the supervisor of the project, they had decided to change their plans and push their fence line back to follow the property line exactly. “Weren’t you notified with a phone call?” the foreman asked Trees. “No,” she replied, “I received no call.” She wasn’t even given the chance to dig up and replant her plants.

Trees went to the Planning Director of Seaside, Kevin Couples, and requested that he come to her house to assess what had happened. He walked the land with her, and upon seeing the new fence line only inches away from the end of her deck affirmed that it was not in the original plans. According to Tom Horning, former chairman and current member of the Seaside Planning Commission, Seaside has no official tree ordinance. It is the responsibility of the property owner to act in a neighborly fashion. “As members of a community it is expected that property owners will act responsibly,” states Horning. Unfortunately those old trees were not protected by the city of Seaside and so they came down without protest. The church has promised to replace the old growth with 22 new plantings of their choice. At this point it is unknown what the final landscape will be, but as far as our wildlife friends are concerned, their home of indigenous trees is gone.

 

before destruction 2

Katie and Ara’s backyard sanctuary before its destruction.

Those trees and that unattended undergrowth were precious and it was hallowed ground. Some of the grandfather trees were counted at well over 100 years old after they were felled. Even the scrubby elderberry served a banquet of berries to the flighty community and provided nesting and resting places. The grander trees, the alders, several holly trees and even the blackberry provided a buffer for sound and a barrier for the wind. We all know that a mature tree produces oxygen, but did you know that a leafy tree produces enough oxygen for 10 people to inhale for a year? Yes. The runoff to our streams are cleaned by the absorption of pollutants. There was precious top soil under that hemlock needle carpet we walked on in that small wood.
– Katie Trees on the land that she and her daughter lost.

Unfortunately, the felled trees were not the only issues of concern when discussing the new development. According to Horning, the commissioners got a little sidetracked from the trees during their meeting because they were dealing with the pertinent problem of drainage and storm run-off. Doubling the parking spaces also means doubling the amount of auto toxins that the land receives. Horning’s concern was for the vitality of nearby Coho Creek, and the negative effects that the toxins from storm run-off would have on salmon runs. To deal with this problem a suggestion was made during the meeting that the church put in a bioswale to filter the added toxins. A bios wale is an underground media filter, water quality treatment box. This suggestion was rejected on the basis that it would impede on the 30 foot buffer land surrounding the parking lot. The drainage for the property currently flows directly into Coho Creek.

The elderberry show... birdy delight.

The elderberry show… birdy delight.

Tom Horning was the only member of the 7-member Planning Commission to vote “no” on the plans that were presented. He made a last request that the church replant half a dozen Sitka spruce trees within the 30 foot boundary so that the indigenous trees would fill in the area and eventually turn it back into a forested area again. His request was not granted and the plans were passed 6-1.

woodpecker

The rare hairy woodpecker who visited often.

Katie Trees has been made painfully aware of how fleeting words and promises can be as she awaits the future of her demolished yard. The property line is only inches from the end of her deck and she dreads the possibility that a fence will be built along that line. For now, the sounds of excavators and dump trucks have replaced the sound of bird songs and woodpeckers. The view from her kitchen window is cement, turned-up land, and an 8-foot-high wall with 6-foot-tall fence posts on top of that; the purpose, she is told, is privacy.

birds 2

“My daughter loved tose sweet babies. She was able to get them to eat out of her hand. They slept in the snag right off the back, There were holes pecked out by the woodpeckers that they nestled in.” – Katie Trees

This is a story of loss. This is Katie’s story, but as a community, this is our story. Within it are broken promises and irreverence for the precious resources that we all share. We forget that with ownership comes responsibility. Within a community we are responsible to each other and to the earth that gives us life. In the end, if we do not have this, then what do we have?

Editors Note: This story as pointed out by contributing writer Erin Hofseth, is a story of loss. The owners of the land, The LDS Church, were well within there right to utilize their property. There was no reply to Hofseth’s queries to LDS representatives. Planning Commissions are the interpreters of ordinances, codes, standards to interpret and enforce. They are also empowered to forge compromise, and today the great opportunity exists to enlist counsel of conservation organizations in place, such as watershed councils and organizations like the North Coast Land Conservancy. Public input also plays a viable role. We hope that this story spurs consideration by our readers to the matters of impact of land development presented.


The Paintings and Politics of Sandy Roumagoux

sandy There is a slim volume on my bookshelf called “Heaven Bound,” a collection of 21 paintings and 21 corresponding poems, a collaborative and lyrical expression of the somewhat sorry state of our worlds, both physical and spiritual. “Heaven Bound” is a thing of beauty, depth, wit, horror, irreverence. The paintings are by Newport-based artist Sandy Roumagoux (pronounced room’-a-goo). The poems, by Roumagoux’s good friend Jim Fleming, were written in response to each of the paintings.

“Heaven Bound” was published by Cape Perpetua Press as a limited edition in 1998. Fifteen years later, the inspirational force behind those poems – Roumagoux’s paintings – have held up, timeless and universal. Within them are themes and images that continue to infuse the painter’s work: recognition and acceptance of the paradoxical absurdities of existence; anger at human disregard for and abuse of nature; rejection of society’s acceptance of violence and hypocrisy. Dogs, salmon, rural folk, carrion, toxic discards, religious imagery are plunked down, with satirical edge, amidst bucolic surroundings.

Roumagoux paints what she sees, what grabs her, as she drives the back roads of Lincoln County. Her new work on view at KALA is, like her old work, rich, gorgeous, big (the biggest canvas is 4’x6’). In a few of the new paintings, Roumagoux elegantly inserts human-made beauty – the classic form of a Conde McCullough bridge in cerulean blue, for example – into the wild. Some of the paintings are joyful or hopeful. Others reflect, simultaneously, deep serenity and profound loneliness. Still others are subtle-yet-biting commentaries on modern rural life. Every one of the paintings is strikingly beautiful, even those of discarded tires in the landscape, tires that nature has covered up and disguised as benign under green waves of salal and blackberries. The tires become part of the flora, hauntingly appealing in much the same way the Ashcan School of the early 20th Century turned the squalor of New York’s Lower East Side into a thing of aching beauty.

sandyart2

“It is more beautiful than ugly, but it doesn’t excuse it,” says Roumagoux of her Tire Series. “You don’t think about it because of the vegetation. Nature covers waste, but it’s still not a good thing.”

Among Roumagoux’s early creative influences are Marsden Hartley, Milton Avery and C.S. Price – and it shows. Her use of color, application of paint and representational-yet-abstract composition are similar. But her subject matter is almost always more activist than theirs ever was. Her work gives voice to strong personal opinions and points of view.

My favorite painting in the show is arrestingly subversive. In it, a hand-painted sign that reads “If You Go To Hell, It’s Your Fault” hangs above an apprehensive, sitting dog. Two men lounge nearby. Behind them is a rotting pile of salmon carcasses. The men nonchalantly gaze over the sign and over the dog and ignore the rotting salmon. The painting seems to be an indictment of the way much of society chooses to look elsewhere rather than struggle with thorny problems such as fishery depletion and environmental degradation.

“I focus on our culture’s abuse of the environment, our love affair with greed, our throw-away consumerism and our sanitizing of violence,” writes Roumagoux in her online artist’s statement. “These abuses are glossed over with religious platitudes.”

sandyart3
The plain fact of the matter is that Roumagoux is a very political painter. She also is – surprise! – a very painterly politician. Sandy Roumagoux, Painter, is also Sandra Roumagoux, Mayor.

“I’ve been called political, but I don’t know how to separate politics from art. Both ask something of us, something that challenges us to a responsibility. Painter or politician, we come as candidates. We want our message to resonate with the body politic, with the voters. We make promises.”

Roumagoux served on the Newport City Council for several years before her successful run for Mayor of Newport last November. Her experience as a driven, highly lauded regional painter has informed her worldview. She deeply appreciates how much local artists can contribute to a town’s economy and quality of life. Her advice to fellow municipal-government officials?

“Listen to the artists,” she says. “Being an artist is being a small business. If you want to learn how to make a small business go on very little money and overhead, an artist knows how to do it. They do a lot more with a lot less…The arts are great in building community. There shouldn’t be the division that there is. I find it surprising that it still is. We need to learn from one another.”

Sandy Roumagoux exhibits New Paintings at KALA.
Opening Aug 10, 5-8pm, Astoria 2nd Saturday Art Walk
Through Sept 3.
1017 Marine Drive in Astoria. Viewing Hours: Sats/Suns 12 noon to 4pm

KALA presents Newport artist Sandy Roumagoux for the Second Saturday Art Walk in Astoria.  Roumagoux is represented by Blackfish Gallery in Portland.  She received her Bachelor and Masters of Fine Art degrees from the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville where she stayed to teach courses in drawing, painting and design.  She grew up on a farm in the Willamette Valley of Oregon where “gun cabinets were as normal a piece of furniture as the dining table.”  Her paintings are included in the Microsoft Collection, Oregon Health Sciences, University of Arkansas, and she has exhibited in the Oregon Biennial, Portland Art Museum and the Galerie Brati Capku in Prague, Czech Republic.  Currently, she is serving a two year term as the mayor of Newport, Oregon and is melding her love of politics with that of a painter/artist.


June 2013

June 2013 Cover


Dragalution – a drag revolution

(L to R) Marco Davis, Spencer Gotter, Cameron Wagner, David Drafall, Jessamyn Grace

(L to R) Marco Davis, Spencer Gotter, Cameron Wagner, David Drafall, Jessamyn Grace

Breaking down barriers . . . daring, deeelicious and just a little dirty.

DRAGALUTION
January 26 • February 2
10pm (doors open 9:30)
Tickets at door only
$8, $5 in drag
Columbian Theater, Astoria

Apply foundation, and lots of it. Powder is next. Now apply wax to the brow, because soon to take its place is a new, higher brow, wielding one hell of an attitude, honey. Yes Girl, no . . . not two shades of eye shadow, at least three or four to be sure. Those five-inch heels will make you high as a “queen,” and your crowning glory, locks of gorgeous, big hair. “Ooooooh, let it go!!!”

Every theater role calls the performer to a transformation. DRAGALUTION creator/director Marco Davis implores, “Revolution!” As the “performance family” is getting trained in the finer details of stage drag; how to sashay down the isle, wave your index finger, and trip the light fantastic in a pair of stilettos, his fourth (in three years) consecutive extravaganza at the Columbian Theater coming soon, is not a conceptual homage to traditional drag performance, it is drag performance.

If you attended any of these shows, the last in June of 2011, The ERUPTION, you were part of a Bacchanalian-esque celebration performance production. Davis takes non-dancers, gives them choreography and balletic storyline, dance as symbol and imagery, and magic happens. “Magic” may not be the precise term here . . . but somewhere along the line the audience becomes a part of the theatrical “fourth wall.” Like when Mozart — portrayed in the film “Amadeus” after he performs “The Magic Flute” for the stuffy aristocrats — heads downtown, where his homeys have a whole other version going on, and their having a lot more fun.

As charismatic off-stage as on, long time, beloved local dance instructor/choreographer and tantalizing cook at the Columbian Café, Davis inspires people to “come-out.” It is his mantra. His past shows have included original sketches by numerous creative performing artists in the region; such as irresistible rapper Teresa Barnes of Fever Damn fame and her slightly bent “Annie” in the 2010 production “The Event,” and musical counterpart Andria Mazzarella (“The Eruption,” 2011) in a comedy version of “Like a Virgin” for which she pulls a gigantic seemingly impossible plastic bouquet out of her bosom . . . now that’s magic. And tattoo artist Chris Lee, (The Eruption) in his incredible choreographed quasi-break dance number that brought down the house.

As “THE EVENT” encompassed techno, jazz and pop covers, and various story themes, DRAGALUTION is a fully concepted show. Davis (as Drag Mother she is “Daylight C—- “ yes, that beautiful thing you do when you have an orgasm) has given family drag names of naughty innuendo to all performers. He’s written original songs, collaborating with local musician and sound recording artist Tyler Little. Find a sneak preview of the opening number, an exhilarating and pounding techno-declaration “I am,” on YouTube. In addition, substituted lyrics from familiar Broadway and pop numbers for example, express the trials and tribulations in a drag queen’s life. Song and dance numbers include trios and duets, and singer/dancers will lip sync to their own-recorded voices. Be it ironic gender theater or not; the show’s song and dance numbers encompass a wide range of expression from comic, to sexy, dirty, sweet, and inspiring.

As a performing member of the DRAGALUTION family (including numerous dancers back for a third show), conversations with inquisitives have erupted on the issue of women doing drag. Such as “So, the women are doing drag kings? Wait a minute, women in drag as women. What . . . how does that work?”

Entrée accentuated feminista!

“If everyone could get an ounce of strength that Drag Queens have, to go out against adversity, to go out there and be glorious – if we did that in our everyday life — just stepping out there be a little more colorful, and be more honest about who we are as individuals – I think that we can find a lot more happiness,” says Davis on the topic.

While certainly the drag king aspect isn’t ruled out in future endeavors, Davis was keen on developing this particular craft of hyper-feminine expression in our culture, and giving performers the opportunity to take it on as a process – for females to even counter-investigate a male persona to get in touch with their inner diva.

“For me, it’s been an opportunity to dig deep within my self and draw out sides that are more unseen. To look at what qualities I embody and am comfortable with in my daily life and become something more, bringing to life a more full self, a side with less fear and more strength,” says cast member Cameron Wagner (aka Jenna Tell’Ya). Wagner has experimented with drag persona outside the show, pushing the envelope of self-identity. “I’m learning that to shine and to let myself come out and be authentic, doesn’t mean that my ego grows. It’s quite the opposite. I feel more grateful and humble than ever for this time to be creative, to be playful and to see myself blossom. I’m loving every minute of it and am thankful to Daylight and all my sister Queens for their hard work and friendship in this unique unconventional journey.”

And while drag is a strong component of gay culture, male performers in the show, gay or not have risen to the opportunity to walk in different shoes. “A journey of a lifetime begins with a single step, they say. What they didn’t tell me is that that step wouldn’t include a set of sensible heels. These heels couldn’t be less sensible, honey! That’s what makes them great,” says Nicholas Wheeler (aka Anya Allnight).

Drag has been getting a lot of play in the Lower Columbia these days. The Astor Street Opry Co., has performed their Topsy Turvey version of “Shanghaied in Astoria” for several years running, providing an almost subversive yet hilarious form of entertainment. And the Astoria Downtown Assoc. actually recently won an award from the Oregon Main St. Association for “dragging” business men to the stage in their whacky fundraising event The Jane Barnes Revue, and raising a good amount of money to see what Chamber Director Skip Hauke looked like all “dolled-up.”

Are these productions breaking down barriers? Personally, I would say they are touching on the possibility, while the intention is pure entertainment, and there they do succeed. But what puts the revolution in Dragalution, is its realness. Dragalution is about owning it. Performer Miranda Rinks (aka Komina Sideja), has discovered, “I’m excited to be out of my comfort zone and in a spot light. I was a super tomboy throughout my early twenties and as I pranced through the theater in heels following and mirroring Mama Daylight (Marco) it seemed beautiful, fitting and wondrous that this lovable man was teaching me to be womanly. What a creative opportunity to become more myself, by being someone else entirely.”

Performer Spencer Gotter ( aka Inya Sotight ) speaks forthrightly, “Although this is my first show with Daylight, I’ve been dressing up as a girl since I was four and called myself Lindsey Baker. Even then I realized how comfortable women’s clothing was. I took 23 years off from dressing in drag but decided that Daylight’s show was the perfect time to have my unveiling as a drag queen,” and furthers, “I’m always looking for things in life that push the envelope of my comfort zone. I figured dressing up in drag would be one of those things. I’m sure that some people will be out of their comfort zone and maybe even offended. Nothing about this show has pushed my comfort zone. It is either a sign that I truly don’t care who you are or what you do that makes you a good human being, or that I have no shame in who I am or what I do in this life. Probably both. Daylight has proved yet again that love exists everywhere and that it is up to each of us to push the boundary and to be accepting.”

There isn’t anything that isn’t courageous about this show. Heading down to the Columbian Theater at 9:30pm during the weekday – as the theater clears after the nightly movie showing – takes a certain amount of it. Learning numerous dance numbers knowing you’re not a trained dancer, and just going for it, takes some courage. The dance moves are gloriously fun, doable, but they’ll work a girl. Especially when you’re the oldest Queen, the cast age ranging from 20’s to 50’s. But the joy of colliding with 10 other committed performers late at night, and doing it together creates a whole new version of vitality and love of being.

Jessamyn Grace (aka Amanda Blowhard) a professional belly dancer who probably comes with the most current background in dance speaks to her experience, “My life has often been dappled with non-conventional opportunities ranging from the animated to the introverted, and every time I’ve said ‘yes’ to each one I’ve been rewarded with personal growth. My experience with Dragalution is no exception. With each challenge I find I am supported by remarkable teachers – Marco, the cast, my character- all have shown me the importance of learning, trusting and laughing (and I mean really laughing). For me this show is very much about risk and love, the reciprocal relationship between the two, and being strong enough to embrace both without fear or hesitation.”

As the poster reads, “Explicit • 21 + Only. “We have been conditioned over time to think that these words are terrible and evil, full of hell fire and damnation, they are words – we need to stop making them so violent,” remarks Davis. And, they’re simply going to make you laugh, open up your boundaries, and possibly reprioritize what you should really take serious in your life.

The poster also says, you’ll pay $5 if you’re in drag. “People have been asking me what to do for drag, in regards to dressing up to come to the show, and I say, look inside yourself and take that part of you that you are afraid to share about yourself and dress it up and make it sparkle,” says Davis.

“What I find so incredible is the strength it takes to step outside of your comfort zone and present a larger than life alternate version of who you are, what your inner drag queen is. I feel that if we were all able to tap into that aspect of our lives a little more frequently and honestly and let our friends see other aspects of who we are, that we would live in a much richer, kinder and colorful world. We have to cast aside our fears of being judged by our peers and families and allow our souls breath and light. We can’t keep it hidden away. Share your inner queen and lets laugh together a little more. We are worth it!”

Thank you Mother Daylight for your wisdom and so generously creating a stage for us, Sister Queens and to our audience, so much love. Now lets get ready for a DRAGALUTION!

– Sofanda Dykes


Warrenton – Small Town Politics At Its Finest (Continued)

Here’s where Part I (the mayor’s race) of Amy Bugbee’s series of articles on the election in Warrenton finishes up, and Part 2 -LNG, crime, development, council seats, city pride, and more on what’s ticking in this transforming community – in its entirety is located. Continued from page 11 in the print edition of HIPFiSHmonthly’s October 2014 issue (click on image above to download the pdf of the print edition).


COASTER THEATER SUMMER REP – chock-full of comedy and music

California Suite

Frank Jagodnik and Pia Shepard play a British star and her husband on their way to the Academy Awards -- one of four playlets in Neil Simon’s comedy, set in Los Angeles in the ‘70s, California Suite. through September 3. Tickets: $20 & $15.

Putnam County Spelling Bee

Putnam County, 2006... 6 student spellers with issues... a junior high school assistant principle with issues... a former champion speller with issues... a “comfort counselor” doing community service... 4 audience volunteers... great music, dance, and a lot of humor! It’s The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee by Finn & Sheinkin. An unusual aspect of the show is that four real audience members are invited on stage to compete in the spelling bee. Be one. (pictured l to r: Amanda Payne, Julia Shepherd, Richard Bowman, Darren Hull Cameron Gates, Todd Payne). Through Sept 17. TICKETS: $23 & $18.

Third in the Summer Rep Season: The Mystery of Irma Vep by Charles Ludlum. Manacrest Manor House, on the moors, some time in the 19th Century . . . 2 actors . . . numerous characters . . . an Egyptian crypt . . . a mummy case . . . quick changes . . . parody, vaudeville, farce, melodrama . . . lightning fast sleight-of-hand . . . vampires and werewolves! Written by NYC toast of drag theater, Charles Ludlum.

Through October 15. TICKETS: $20 & $15. PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE: Shows run Wed – Sat @ 8pm, Sun 7pm. See coastertheatre.com for schedule. 108 N. Hemlock in Cannon Beach,  503.436.1242 (photos by George Vetter).


Naseem Rakha – Manzanita Writers Series Aug 20

Naseem RakhaNASEEM RAKHA reads from her book The Crying Tree at the Manzanita Writers Series event at 7pm on Saturday, August 20.

Set in southern Illinois and central Oregon, The Crying Tree tells a story of a mother who must overcome the hate, grief, and secrets that surround the murder of her 15-year-old son, and defy church and family as she attempts to stop the execution of  his perpetrator. With the heart of a storyteller, Rahka explores the death penalty, and the act of forgiveness through the lens of the justice system as well as subsequent interviews with crime victims, inmates, corrections officials and exonerated death row prisoners.

The American Booksellers Association chose The Crying Tree for its TOP 10 Indie Next list for Reading Groups. The book has been published in six international editions. Naseem is an award-winning author and journalist whose stories have been heard on NPR’s All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Marketplace Radio, Christian Science Monitor, and Living on Earth. She lives in Oregon with her husband, son, and many animals.

Following the reading and Q&A, an Open Mic features up to nine local writers at 5 minute reading spots. The recommended theme for this month is “Forgiveness.”

Admission for the evening is $5. At the Hoffman Center (across from Manzanita Library at 594 Laneda Avenue). FMI: hoffmanblog.org.


HIPFiSH May 2001 Calendar

Monday 9

LECTURE

We Need to Talk. Want a free guided tour of a neglected pleasure? Robert Brake will present a free public lecture/discussion, “We need to talk.” Topics include: why conversations are so important, how to deal with boring people, male/female differences as conversationalists and more. Free, 11:30am -1pm at the Peninsula Senior Center in Klipsan Beach, WA

THEATER

Auditions. “Dead Man’s Cell Phone.” Roles for men and women, ages 20 through 40. The play is a comedy/mystery and commentary on technology. 7pm at Pier Pressure Productions in Astoria. 503-791-8914

Tuesday 10

MUSIC

Richard T. Blues. No cover, 5:30 – 8:30pm at T Paul’s Supper Club in Astoria.

Brian O’Connor. Jazz guitar. No cover, 6pm at the Shelburne Inn in Seaview, WA

Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6:30pm at the Harbor Bite in Seaside.

Open Mic Night. Hosted by Barney Perrine. No cover, 7 -9pm at Creekside Restaurant & Lounge in Seaside.

FOOD & DRINK

Coastal Encounters Series. Bread making with Danelle Lochrie and Stephanie Lushina of Rockfish Bakery. A field trip TBA follows later in the week. 6:30pm at Driftwood Library in Lincoln City. khobson@driftwoodlib.org

Ham Dinner. 5 -7pm at St Alban’s Church in Tillamook. 503-842-6192

Wednesday 11

MUSIC

Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at the Rio Café in Astoria

Open Mic Night. No cover, 7pm at Lush Wine Bar in Cannon Beach.

HAPPENING

OR Fish & Wildlife Big Game regulations Meeting. Open to the Public. Topics for discussion and comment by the public include; tag numbers for 2011 hunts, proposed hunting seasons, and regulations for the 2012 hunting season. 4 – 7pm at the Seaside Civic & Convention Center.

Team Trivia Tournament. Answer the most questions correctly & win prizes & bragging rights. 6pm at the Seaside Public Library.

Ecstatic Dance. Spirit-filled, freestyle, yogic trance dance. $5 – $7, 6:30 – 7:45pm, at Pine Grove Community House in Manzanita

Thursday 12

MUSIC

Richard T. Jazz/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at Lil’ Bayou in Seaside.

Basin Street NW. Jazz. No cover, 6:30pm at the Bridgewater Bistro in Astoria.

Jam Session. No cover, 7pm at the Triangle Tavern in Astoria.

Jim Wilkins. 7pm at the Voodoo Room in Astoria.

Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 9pm at Sam’s Seaside Café in Seaside.

HAPPENING

Knitting/Spinning Group. 3 – 5pm at the Astoria Fiber Arts Academy.

Poetry Open Mike. No cover, 8:30pm at the Wine Bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

THEATER

The Dixie Swim Club. Comedy. $8 – $20, 7:30pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Friday 13

MUSIC

Pick & Hammer. 3:30 – 6:30pm at the Columbia Pacific Farmers Market in Long Beach, WA

Bill Hayes. Rock/Folk/Bluegrass. No cover, 5 – 8pm at the Cannon Beach Cookie Company.

Tom Trudell. Jazz piano. No cover, 6 – 9pm at Clemente’s in Astoria.

Asleep at the Switch. Blues, Country, 40’s, & 50’s. Free (donations accepted), 6 – 8pm at the City Hall in Garibaldi.

Richard T. Jazz/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

Cannon Beach Chorus. Classical/Folk. $10, students 16 & younger free. 7pm at the Cannon Beach Presbyterian Church.

The Northstar Session. Alternative/Pop/Rock. No cover, 7pm at McMenamins Sand Trap in Gearhart.

Andy Combs and the Moth. Other. No cover, 8pm at Hazel’s Tavern in Astoria.

HAPPENING

THEATER

Beauty and the Beast Jr. Musical. $7 adults, $4 students. 7pm at the Naselle High School Commons in Naselle, WA

The Dixie Swim Club. Comedy. $8 – $20, 8pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Saturday 14

MUSIC

Musician’s Jam. Free, 2 – 4pm at the Tillamook Library.

Tom Trudell. Jazz piano. No cover, 5:30pm at the Bridgewater Bistro in Astoria.

Columbia Crew. Folk. No cover, 6pm at Charlie’s Chowder House in Astoria.

Matthew Hayward Macdonald. Celtic. $5, 7pm at the Old Long Beach Train Depot in Long Beach, WA

North Coast Chorale. Spring Bicentennial Concert, “Voices of Astoria Past, Present, & Future.” 7pm at the PAC in Astoria.

Radio Cowboy. Cosmic Country Roots Rock. A benefit concert for the North Head Lighthouse. $10 suggested donation, 7pm at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum in Ilwaco, WA

Oyster Shooters. Alternative/Classic Rock/Rock. $5 cover, 9pm at the San Dune Pub in Manzanita.

ART

Astoria’s Second Saturday Art Walk. 5 – 9pm downtown Astoria.

CINEMA

The Stranger (1946). $2, 11am at the Bijou Theater in Lincoln City.

FOOD & DRINK

Pancake Breakfast. $5 for adults, $3 for children. 8am – 11am at the Peninsula Senior Activity Center in Klipsan Beach, WA

Wine Tasting. Carlton Cellars. 1 – 4pm at the Cellar on 10th in Astoria

Seaside Downtown Wine Walk. $7,50 for a commemorative wine glass plus nominal tasting fees. Register at the Carousel Mall. 3 – 7pm at various locations in downtown Seaside.

Wine Tasting Special. $9 for 4 2-oz pours + complimentary appetizers. 4 – 6pm at the Wine bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

Pints for Parkinson’s. A fundraising dinner for the Michael J Fox foundation for Parkinson’s Research. $20, 6pm. FMI & tickets, go to: www.pintsforparkinsons.weebly.com

Winemaker’s Dinner. Carlton Cellars. Reservations required, 503-325-6600. 6pm at the Cellar on 10th in Astoria.

Oregon Hunter’s Banquet. At the Tillamook County Fairgrounds in Tillamook. FMI 503-842-2475

HAPPENING

2nd Saturday Social Dance. 2leftfeet OK. $5 sliding scale, 7:30pm at NCRD in Nehalem.

Paws N’ Stars 4-H Dog Show. At the Tillamook County Fairgrounds. FMI 503-842-8967

Lower Columbia Pug Socializing Club. Pugs and their people meet monthly for fun and socialization. 11am at Carruthers Park in Warrenton.

Touch a Truck. Big rig fun fest. Free, noon – 2pm at the Lincoln City Community Center parking. FMI 541-994-2131

OUTSIDE

Mental Health Walk. 9am at the Bolstad Beach approach in Long Beach, WA

Radio Control Rock Climber West Coast Championships. Locations to be announced on beaches in the Long Beach, WA area. Starts at 8am. 949-600-8642

THEATER

Beauty and the Beast Jr. Musical. $7 adults, $4 students. 7pm at the Naselle High School Commons in Naselle, WA

The Dixie Swim Club. Comedy. $8 – $20, 8pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Sunday 15

MUSIC

Salty Dogs. 10am – 3pm at the Astoria Sunday Market.

All That Jazz. Jazz. No cover (donations accepted). 2pm at the Wet Dog Café in Astoria.

North Coast Chorale. Spring Bicentennial Concert, “Voices of Astoria Past, Present, & Future.” 2pm at the PAC in Astoria.

Cannon Beach Chorus. Spring Voices Concert. Classical/Folk. $10, 3pm at the Rockaway Community Church in Rockaway Beach.

Swingcats. Swing/Jazz/Blues. No cover, 6pm at Lil’ Bayou in Seaside.

Buffalo Death Beam. Concrete/ Folk Rock/Shoegaze. No cover. 8pm at Fort George Brewery & Public House in Astoria.

FOOD & DRINK

Pancake Breakfast. All-you-can-eat for $5, 8am – noon at the Bay City Arts Center.

Cannon Beach American Legion Breakfast. $7 adults, $3 children under 6. 9 – 11:30am at the American Legion Hall in Cannon Beach.

Freindship Circle Tea and Luncheon. Food, drink, performance, and raffle. $8 suggested donation, raffle tickets are $1 each. Luncheon will be served at 12:30pm with the program to follow. At the Rosburg Community Hall in Rosburg, WA 360-465-2740

LECTURE

In Their Footsteps Lecture Series. “For Want of Branes”, hide tanning & sewing with Bob and Gayle Kitch. Park fees apply, 1pm at the Netul Room at the Fort Clatsop Visitor’s Center.

THEATER

The Dixie Swim Club. Comedy. $8 – $20, 3pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Tuesday 17

MUSIC

Richard T. Blues. No cover, 5:30 – 8:30pm at T Paul’s Supper Club in Astoria.

Brian O’Connor. Jazz guitar. No cover, 6pm at the Shelburne Inn in Seaview, WA

Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6:30pm at the Harbor Bite in Seaside.

Open Mic Night. Hosted by Barney Perrine. No cover, 7 -9pm at Creekside Restaurant & Lounge in Seaside.

FOOD & DRINK

Coastal Encounters Series. Coffee and coffee roasting with Elaine McCracken of Cape Foulweather Coffee with a field trip TBA later in the week. 6:30pm at the Driftwood Library in Lincoln City. khobson@driftwoodlib.org

Wednesday 18

MUSIC

Open Mic Night. 5 -7pm at the Three Cups Coffee House in Astoria.

Open Mic Night. Hosted by Ann Tierney. All levels welcome. 5 – 7pm at Wheelhouse Coffee Company in Astoria.

Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at the Rio Café in Astoria,

Open Mic Night. 7 – 9pm at Lush Wine Bar in Cannon Beach.

Birch Book. Folk. $7 cover, 7pm at the Astoria Arts & Movement Center. 503-791-4557

HAPPENING

Nautical Renaissance. Tours, sails and other events with the tall ships Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain at the Port of Ilwaco. FMI, go to funbeach.com

Ecstatic Dance. Spirit-filled, freestyle, yogic trance dance. $5 – $7, 6:30 – 7:45pm, at Pine Grove Community House in Manzanita

Thursday 19

MUSIC

Richard T. Jazz/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at Lil’ Bayou in Seaside.

Basin Street NW. Jazz. No cover, 6:30pm at the Bridgewater Bistro in Astoria.

Jam Session. No cover, 7pm at the Triangle Tavern in Astoria.

Jim Wilkins. 7pm at the Voodoo Room in Astoria.

Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 9pm at Sam’s Seaside Café in Seaside.

FOOD & DRINK

Fundraising Dinner. $7 for adults and $5 for children includes. 5 – 6:30pm at the Peninsula Senior Activity Center in Klipsan Beach, WA

HAPPENING

Nautical Renaissance. Tours, sails and other events with the tall ships Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain at the Port of Ilwaco. FMI, go to funbeach.com

Knitting/Spinning Group. 3 – 5pm at the Astoria Fiber Arts Academy.

Poetry Open Mike. No cover, 8:30pm at the Wine Bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

LECTURE

Astor’s Empire. With James P Rhonda. $15, S/S/M $13, 7pm at the Liberty Theater in Astoria.

LITERARY

Author Appearance. Dane Batty author of “WANTED: Gentleman Bank Robber”. There will be book sales, signings, and refreshments will be served. Free, 7pm at the Seaside Library.

THEATER

The Dixie Swim Club. Comedy. $8 – $20, 8pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Friday 20

MUSIC

Greg Parke. 3:30 – 6:30pm at the Columbia Pacific Farmers Market in Long Beach, WA

Bill Hayes. Rock/Folk/Bluegrass. No cover, 5 – 8pm at the Cannon Beach Cookie Company.

Tom Trudell. Jazz piano. No cover, 5:30pm at the Shelburne Inn in Seaview, WA

Asleep at the Switch. Blues, Country, 40’s, & 50’s. Free (donations accepted), 6 – 8pm at the City Hall in Garibaldi.

Richard T. Jazz/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

Cornmeal. Bluegrass/Jam Band/Progressive. No cover, 7pm at McMenamins Sand Trap in Gearhart.

North Oregon Coast Symphony Concert. “Russian Harp.” 7pm at the PAC in Astoria.

ART

Opening Reception. For an exhibit of work by Yoshihiko Yoshida, a master potter from Mino, Japan. 6pm at the CCC Art Center Gallery in Astoria.

HAPPENING

Adventure Sails & Battle Sails. On the tall ships Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain. The 3- hour family-oriented Adventure Sail features a living history experience with demonstrations of tall ship handling, sea shanty singing, and maritime storytelling. Battle Sails feature booming cannons, close quarters maneuvers, and a taste of 18th century maritime life aboard tall ships. Adventure sails are $35 – $55 per person and are at 10am. Battle sails are $40 – $60 per person and are at 2pm. Board at the 17th St dock in Astoria.

Shively Fountain Restoration Ceremony & Ribbon Cutting. Refreshments will be served. Free, 2pm at Maritime Memorial Park in Astoria.

The Chinook Nation and Other Northwest Native Americans. NW tribal songs, music, and dance. $18, S/S/M $15, 7:30pm at the Liberty Theater in Astoria.

North Oregon Coast Law Enforcement & Tilla-Wheels Annual Cruise-In. 6 – 10pm on Main Ave in Tillamook.

THEATER

The Dixie Swim Club. Comedy. $8 – $20, 8pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

OUTSIDE

Open Golf Tournament. At Manzanita Golf Course. FMI call 503-368-5744

Saturday 21

MUSIC

Musician’s Jam. Free, 2 – 4pm at the Tillamook Library.

Tom Trudell. Jazz piano. 5:30pm at Clemente’s in Astoria.

Drop Dead Legs. Van Halen Tribute Band. $5 cover, 9pm at the San Dune Pub in Manzanita.

ART

Master Potter Yoshihiko Yoshida. “In the Mino Tradition” lecture, slide show & music. 7pm at the PAC in Astoria.

CINEMA

A Star is Born (1937). $2, 11am at the Bijou Theater in Lincoln City.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting. Turley. 1 – 4pm at the Cellar on 10th in Astoria

Wine Tasting Special. $9 for 4 2-oz pours + complimentary appetizers. 4 – 6pm at the Wine bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

Winemaker’s Dinner. Turley. Reservations required, 503-325-6600. 6pm at the Cellar on 10th in Astoria.

HAPPENING

Vintage Fashion Show. Includes lunch. $20, 1 -3pm at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum in Ilwaco, WA

Heritage Fair. Celebrating Astoria’s cultural diversity with food booths, demonstrations, music, dance performances, arts & crafts, weaving, and family friendly events. Starts at 9:30am at the Sunset Empire Transit Center Parking Lot in Astoria. http://astoria200.org/default.asp?deptid=1&com=events&eventID=2

North Oregon Coast Law Enforcement & Tilla-Wheels Club Show & Shine. Starts at 8am at the parking lot at the Tillamook County Creamery Assn. in Tillamook. 503-842-7591

United Paws Adoptathon. Dogs, cats, and kittens available for adoption. Noon – 3pm at the Tennis Court Bldg at the Tillamook County Fairgrounds.

Mutt Masters Dog Show & Olympics. Includes dog competitions for all breeds, sizes and ages. Registration begins at 11AM. Cost: $3 per dog, per category or $25 per dog for unlimited entries. Doggie vendors, prizes and more! 1545 SE 50th St in Lincoln City. FMI 541-996-1274, 800-452-2151, www.oregoncoast.org

LITERARY

Author Appearance. Vivian Swift, author of “When Wanders Cease to Roam”. After the reading, Vivian will be on hand for book sales and signings. Free, 3pm at the Seaside Library.

OUTSIDE

Great White Tail Run. Courses include a 10K, 5K and 2 mile run throughout the Julia Butler Hansen National Wildlife Refuge. Registration at 8:30am, race starts at 10am. At Skamokawa, WA 360-795-9996

Open Golf Tournament. At Manzanita Golf Course. FMI call 503-368-5744

Reach the Beach. A fundraising bicycle relay ride that ends at the beach at Pacific City. 503-459-4508 Pre-registration at http://action.lungusa.org/site/TR?fr_id=3050&pg=entry

Glass Floats. 100 hand-crafted glass sand dollars and 100 glass crabs along with 200 additional glass floats will await discovery along the 7.5 miles of Lincoln City beaches, weather and ocean permitting. FMI 541-996-1274, 800-452-2151

THEATER

The Land of the Dragon. A stylized Chinese play. $18, S/S/M $15, 7:30pm at the Liberty Theater in Astoria.

The Dixie Swim Club. Comedy. $8 – $20, 8pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Sunday 22

MUSIC

Brownsmead Flats. 10am – 3pm at the Astoria Sunday Market.

Tom Trudell. Jazz piano. No cover, 11am at the Bridgewater Bistro in Astoria.

Country-Folk Music Jam. Americana. Bring your instruments and take part. 1pm at the Tillamook Forest Center, on Hwy 6, east of Tillamook.

All That Jazz. Jazz. No cover (donations accepted). 2pm at the Wet Dog Café in Astoria.

North Oregon Coast Symphony. “Russian Harp.” $10, 3pm at the Tillamook United Methodist Church.

Swing Cats. Swing/Jazz/Blues. No cover, 5pm at Clemente’s in Astoria.

Colleen Raney. Celtic/Irish. No cover. 8pm at Fort George Brewery & Public House in Astoria.

FOOD & DRINK

Cannon Beach American Legion Breakfast. $7 adults, $3 children under 6. 9 – 11:30am at the American Legion Hall in Cannon Beach.

Chef’s Night Out. Food & drink included. $40 per person, 5:30 – 7:30pm at the Ballroom at the Surfsand Resort in Cannon Beach.

HAPPENING

Adventure Sails & Battle Sails. FMI, see Friday, May 20.

OUTSIDE

Open Golf Tournament. At Manzanita Golf Course. FMI call 503-368-5744

Glass Floats. 100 hand-crafted glass sand dollars and 100 glass crabs along with 200 additional glass floats will await discovery along the 7.5 miles of Lincoln City beaches, weather and ocean permitting. FMI 541-996-1274, 800-452-2151

Mutt Run. A 5k run/walk for pets and owners. $10 per person/pet. Registration begins at 8am, Run starts at 9am at 1545 SE 50th St in Lincoln City. FMI 541-994-2131

THEATER

The Dixie Swim Club. Comedy. $8 – $20, 3pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Monday 23

FOOD & DRINK

Ice Cream Social. The public is invited for cake & ice cream + birthday celebration. $1 suggested donation, free if it’s your birthday month. 2pm at the Peninsula Senior Activity Center in Klipsan Beach, WA (3rd Monday)

Tuesday 24

MUSIC

Richard T. Blues. No cover, 5:30 – 8:30pm at T Paul’s Supper Club in Astoria.

Brian O’Connor. Jazz guitar. No cover, 6pm at the Shelburne Inn in Seaview, WA

Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6:30pm at the Harbor Bite in Seaside.

Michael Niflis. Classical guitar. Free, 7pm at the Tillamook Library.

Open Mic Night. Hosted by Barney Perrine. No cover, 7 – 9pm at Creekside Restaurant & Lounge in Seaside.

Wednesday 25

MUSIC

Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6 pm at the Rio Café in Astoria,

Open Mic Night. 7 – 9pm at Lush Wine Bar in Cannon Beach.

ART

Opening Reception. For an exhibit of Tillamook High School Senior Art Student Portfolios. 5 – 6pm at the Bay City Arts Center.

FOOD & DRINK

Coastal Encounters Series. Regional cheese and cheese making with Pat Morford of Three Rivers Chevre and Tami Parr of the Pacific Northwest Cheese Project with a field trip following later in the week. 6:30pm at the Driftwood Library in Lincoln City. khobson@driftwoodlib.org

HAPPENING

Open Mic. All Acts are welcome. No cover, 5 – 7pm at the Three Cups Coffeehouse in Astoria.

Ecstatic Dance. Spirit-filled, freestyle, yogic trance dance. $5 – $7, 6:30 – 7:45pm, at Pine Grove Community House in Manzanita

LITERARY

Local Author Showcase. Writers and friends are invited to come share and listen to original works being read by local authors. Free, 6 – 8pm at Olde Towne Trading Post in Ilwaco, WA

Thursday 26

MUSIC

Tom Trudell. Jazz piano. No cover, 5:30pm at the Shelburne Inn in Seaview, WA

Richard T. Jazz/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at Lil’ Bayou in Seaside.

Basin Street NW. Jazz. No cover, 6:30pm at the Bridgewater Bistro in Astoria.

Jam Session. No cover, 7pm at the Triangle Tavern in Astoria.

Jim Wilkins. 7pm at the Voodoo Room in Astoria.

Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 9pm at Sam’s Seaside Café in Seaside.

HAPPENING

Knitting/Spinning Group. 3 – 5pm at the Astoria Fiber Arts Academy.

Poetry Open Mike. No cover, 8:30pm at the Wine Bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

LITERARY

Rain Magazine Public Reading & Reception. Refreshments will be served. 6pm at the CCC Art Center Gallery in Astoria.

Author Appearance. Spike Walker, author of “On the Edge of Survival”, “Working on the Edge”, and other books. His books inspired the hit television show “Deadliest Catch”. The event will take place in the Community Room. Spike will be available for book sales and signings. Refreshments will be served. Free, 7pm at the Seaside Library.

OUTSIDE

Sand Trap Golf Tourney. $90 per team, $120 per team with cart. 1pm check-in, 2pm start at McMenamins Sand Trap in Gearhart.

THEATER

The Dixie Swim Club. Comedy. $8 – $20, 8pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Friday 27

MUSIC

Ocean Fire. 3:30 – 6:30pm at the Columbia Pacific Farmers Market in Long Beach, WA

The Floyd Light Middle School Orchestra and Choir. Classical/Jazz/Folk. Free, at noon at the Bob Chisholm Community Center in Seaside.

Bill Hayes. Rock/Folk/Bluegrass. No cover, 5 – 8pm at the Cannon Beach Cookie Company.

Tom Trudell. Jazz piano. No cover, 6 – 9pm at Clemente’s in Astoria.

Asleep at the Switch. Blues, Country, 40’s, & 50’s. Free (donations accepted), 6 – 8pm at the City Hall in Garibaldi.

Richard T. Jazz/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

Country Music Jam. Free, 7 – 9pm at the Wickiup Senior Center in Svensen.

Ultronz. Alternative/Powerpop/Surf. $5 cover, 9pm at the San Dune Pub in Manzanita.

James Faretheewell & The Foolhardy. Psychedelic Americana Rock. No cover, 7pm at McMenamins Sand Trap in Gearhart.

HAPPENING

Spring Bazaar. 10am – 4pm at NW Trail Riders Assn in Long Beach, WA

The Enchanted Aunts. A performance by the Astoria School of Ballet. $10, S/S/M $5, 7pm at the Liberty Theater in Astoria.

THEATER

The Dixie Swim Club. Comedy. $8 – $20, 8pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Saturday 28

MUSIC

Troll Radio Revue. Americana. $2 for adults, free for children. 11am – noon at the PAC in Astoria.

Musician’s Jam. Free, 2 – 4pm at the Tillamook Library.

Tom Trudell. Jazz piano. No cover, 5:30pm at the Bridgewater Bistro in Astoria.

Memorial Weekend Blues Festival. With the Norman Sylvester Band. $5 cover, 6pm at the Nehalem Bay Winery near Wheeler.

CINEMA

Monty Python & The Holy Grail (1978). $2, 11am at the Bijou Theater in Lincoln City.

FOOD & DRINK

Pancake Breakfast. $5, 8am – 11am at the Peninsula Activity & Senior Center in Klipsan Beach, WA

Clam Chowder Feed. Free, 11am – 3pm (or until chowder is gone) at the Netarts Community Club in Netarts.

Wine Tasting. Anniversary Celebration & Special Tasting. 1 – 4pm at the Cellar on 10th in Astoria

Wine Tasting Special. $9 for 4 2-oz pours + complimentary appetizers. 4 – 6pm at the Wine bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

HAPPENING

Spring Bazaar. 10am – 4pm at NW Trail Riders Assn in Long Beach, WA

Street Fair. The Warrenton Head Start Parent Group’s Street Fair will take place from 8am – 2pm at the Warrenton Head Start Center. 503-861-2379

Book Sale. 9am – 4pm in Manzanita at two venues: Fiction will be at Pine Grove Community Center, 225 Laneda Avenue, and Nonfiction at the Hoffman Center, 594 Laneda Avenue.

Garibaldi’s Blessing of the Fleet. Time TBA at the docks in Garibaldi. 503-322-3796

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad Dinner Train. Starts at 6:15pm in Garibaldi. FMI: 503-842-7972

THEATER

The Land of the Dragon. A stylized Chinese play. $2 donation at the door. 11am at the PAC in Astoria.

The Dixie Swim Club. Comedy. $8 – $20, 8pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Sunday 29

MUSIC

The Catillacs. 10am – 3pm at the Astoria Sunday Market.

All That Jazz. Jazz. No cover (donations accepted). 2pm at the Wet Dog Café in Astoria.

Red White & Blue Concert. With the Joint Base Lewis-McChord Band. Country/Western. 2pm at the Raymond Theater in Raymond, WA

Swingcats. Swing/Jazz/Blues. No cover, 6pm at Lil’ Bayou in Seaside.

Hobo Nephews of Uncle Frank. Acoustic/Blues/Folk. No cover. 8pm at Fort George Brewery & Public House in Astoria.

FOOD & DRINK

Garibaldi Famous Fish Fry. Noon at the Old Mill Marina in Garibaldi. 503-322-3796

HAPPENING

PNPW Pro Wrestling. $10, 5 – 8pm at the Astoria Event Center.

THEATER

The Dixie Swim Club. Comedy. $8 – $20, 3pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Monday 30

MUSIC

Hobo Nephews of Uncle Frank. Acoustic/Blues/Folk. $5 cover, 9pm at the San Dune Pub in Manzanita.

Tuesday 31

MUSIC

Richard T. Blues. No cover, 5:30 – 8:30pm at T Paul’s Supper Club in Astoria.

Brian O’Connor. Jazz guitar. No cover, 6pm at the Shelburne Inn in Seaview, WA

Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6:30pm at the Harbor Bite in Seaside.

Open Mic Night. Hosted by Barney Perrine. No cover, 7 -9pm at Creekside Restaurant & Lounge in Seaside.

FOOD & DRINK

Coastal Encounters Series. Clamming with William Lackner. Field trip follows on June 1. Field trip participants must have Oregon Shellfish Harvester’s Licenses. Lecture is at 6pm at the Driftwood Library in Lincoln City. khobson@driftwoodlib.org

Wednesday 1

MUSIC

Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at the Rio Café in Astoria,

Baga’s Front Room. Join other music lovers every first Wednesday for song and conversation and maybe to sip a little wine or other beverage. Food available too. 7pm at Lush Wine Bar in Cannon Beach.

HAPPENING

Ecstatic Dance. Spirit-filled, freestyle, yogic trance dance. $5 – $7, 6:30 – 7:45pm, at Pine Grove Community House in Manzanita

Thursday 2

MUSIC

Richard T. Jazz/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at Lil’ Bayou in Seaside.

Basin Street NW. Jazz. No cover, 6:30pm at the Bridgewater Bistro in Astoria.

Jam Session. No cover, 7pm at the Triangle Tavern in Astoria.

Jim Wilkins. 7pm at the Voodoo Room in Astoria.

Salty Dogs. Folk/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 9pm at Sam’s Seaside Café in Seaside.

FOOD & DRINK

Mexican Dinner. $15 for adults, $10 for children. 4 – 7pm at the Husdon House Bed & Breakfast Inn on Hwy 101 south of Cloverdale. 503-392-3533

HAPPENING

Knitting/Spinning Group. 3 – 5pm at the Astoria Fiber Arts Academy.

Poetry Open Mike. No cover, 8:30pm at the Wine Bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

Friday 3

MUSIC

Locust Street Taxi. 3:30 – 6:30pm at the Columbia Pacific Farmers Market in Long Beach, WA

Bill Hayes. Rock/Folk/Bluegrass. No cover, 5 – 8pm at the Cannon Beach Cookie Company.

Tom Trudell. Jazz piano. No cover, 6 – 9pm at Clemente’s in Astoria.

Asleep at the Switch. Blues, Country, 40’s, & 50’s. Free (donations accepted), 6 – 8pm at the City Hall in Garibaldi.

Richard T. Jazz/Blues/Classic Rock. No cover, 6pm at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting. At Taste of Tuscany in Seaside. 503-738-5377

HAPPENING

Vernonia’s First Friday. Arts, entertainment, live music, culture, & special events. 5 -8pm at Scout Cabin in Vernonia.

LITERARY

Author Reading. A river of Words with Michael Pyle & Brian Doyle. A benefit for Rain Magazine. Suggested donation $10, 6pm at the Baked Alaska Expedition Room in Astoria.

Saturday 4

MUSIC

Musician’s Jam. Free, 2 – 4pm at the Tillamook Library.

The Slick Skillet Serenaders. Jazz/Blues/Ragtime. No cover, 8pm at Hazel’s Tavern in Astoria.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting. Sineann. 1 – 4pm at the Cellar on 10th in Astoria

Wine Tasting Special. $9 for 4 2-oz pours + complimentary appetizers. 4 – 6pm at the Wine bar at Sweet Basil’s Café in Cannon Beach.

OUTSIDE

Beach Soccer Tournament. Free for spectators. On the beach near the Broadway Turnaround in Seaside.

Radio Control Aircraft “Fun Fly”. At the North Coast RC Modelers’ Airfield at 13990 Hwy 101, 7 miles south of Tillamook.

THEATER

The Land of the Dragon. A stylized Chinese play. 7:30pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.

Sunday 5

MUSIC

The Bobbers. 10am – 3pm at the Astoria Sunday Market.

Bluegrass Music Jam. 1 – 3pm at the Tillamook Forest Center.

All That Jazz. Jazz. No cover (donations accepted). 2pm at the Wet Dog Café in Astoria.

Swingcats. Swing/Jazz/Blues. No cover, 6pm at Lil’ Bayou in Seaside.

Renegade Minstrels. Blues/Jazz/Roots. No cover. 8pm at Fort George Brewery & Public House in Astoria.

OUTSIDE

Beach Soccer Tournament. Free for spectators. On the beach near the Broadway Turnaround in Seaside.

Radio Control Aircraft “Fun Fly”. At the North Coast RC Modelers’ Airfield at 13990 Hwy 101, 7 miles south of Tillamook.

THEATER

Frogtown. An all ages musical (with frogs) featuring new songs and cast members. $12, with a family rate of 4 for $39. 2pm at the Liberty Theater in Astoria.

The Land of the Dragon. A stylized Chinese play. 3pm at the Coaster Theater in Cannon Beach.


Nature of Things

Nature of Things
Eight years away and I have gone back to church. Not just once a week, but twice. My churches are an “ecstatic dance” group and a late-evening Spanish-language mass in Manzanita. What lured me back were the people and the communal sharing of spirit that, in my mind, defines church. My definition of church is formed in defiance of old norms. It fills the vacuum created by my conscious, if temporary, jettisoning of the institution and is as wide and rich as the spectrum of religion and ideology. It is a definition that allows me to share spiritual community, on some level, with almost anyone.

Institutions of all stripes can draw bold lines that exclude people, or elevate to supreme importance doctrines that divide. Yet spirit unifies—in spite of those who wish to meld it to their purposes, to stake a claim to it. The divine spirit in us all is identical and one can no more sculpt and contain it than wind. Spirit unifies, and thus rattles the bigoted religious as well as the bigoted non-religious (whose bigotry is often aimed at the religious). It unseats those who would use it as a tool to dominate. Spirit breathes life into everyone, even those so resistant to spirit, so dedicated to burying it that they seem to be holding their breath.

In truth, I tend to choke on the edges of religious creed. I carry into any religious or spiritual experience more doubt than actual belief. Yet I can simultaneously honor the life-giving religious and spiritual creeds we humans have developed. A creed is nothing more than a system or formulation of core beliefs, and most of us have core beliefs. We may not recite them communally as creeds, and hopefully we do not use our core beliefs as weapons. Yet this doesn’t change the fact that we have them. When the hard angles of creed are used like sharp elbows, to shove people out, to define who is unwanted rather than to iterate vitalizing understandings, then I believe creeds can do more harm than good. Otherwise, they are formulations by groups of like-minded individuals that infuse life with meaning.

The pinnacle of the church experience for me is the connecting of spirit in myself and others. At Santa Catalina, I most experience this in the “passing of peace.” This is a moment in the service, characteristic of liturgical traditions, when people walk around the sanctuary and share “the peace,” shaking the hand of one person after another and saying “la paz.” With each passing of the peace, my spirit goes on a little mating mission, if you can pardon the earthiness of my analogy. The spirit in me looks into the smile of another, touches the radiant fingers of another, and connects with his or her spirit for a potent moment. One hand bony and fragile, another rough, another gentle and passive, almost limp, another childlike, tiny and sweaty and velveteen. Each hand, the portal to a soul.


The End of Dating – For Me, Anyway

Jeff is 31, and a bit overzealous. He’s charismatic, attractive, generous and knows it. For a while, I was digging him. Then, he began to educate me on an unknown aspect of dating – the power alley. The power alley, as Jeff explained, was the prime age that he and his friends found women to be “datable.” And guess where Jeff and his buddies’ power alley was set? 23-29. This is, according to Jeff, the age range that women have the least amount of baggage and drama. I was so appalled by this blatant form of ageism; I proceeded to drink far too much red wine (it was Malbec – can you blame me?) and sent my most evil glares Jeff’s way.

But, it’s not really Jeff’s fault.

The next morning, after downing ibuprofen and a gallon of water, I began reflecting on Jeff’s theory. Was there really a perfect age range to meet our best match? I had, for years, dated older men; attracted by their confidence and maturity. Oh, and the fact that most of them don’t play video games. But, over the last year and a half as I wrote this column, I frequently dated men in their late 20’s and early 30’s.

Jeff’s dating concept inspired me to develop it further. Perhaps all of us have our own individual power alley, set to specifically match what suits us. Maybe I wasn’t meeting my “one” because I was dating in the wrong alley! We could be on to something here… While Jeff found that women in their 20’s had “less drama” because they didn’t usually have an ex-husband and/or children, I found men in their 20’s to be self-absorbed, knowing little about love. Power alley’s, were not as Jeff asserted, created equally.

From this, I began identifying my own power alley, which allowed me to quit dating the 33-year-old city hippie, who consistently lectured me on the necessity of organic products, but who had neither a job nor a stable living situation. I cut off communication with the 28-year-old who thought that love meant meeting all of his needs while he continually looked at himself in the mirror.

Then, it happened.

In my hometown of Tillamook, Ore., I met the man who was a perfect fit for my power alley. He is 43, holds a master’s degree, is attractive, active, and absolutely adores me. I said a silent “thank you” to Jeff as I realized that his power alley theory had paid off. Getting clear about my perfect match – older, more mature and alive to deeper aspects of life- made it possible for me to attract him into my world.

And because I’ve now found my match (didn’t I set my New Year’s intention to meet “the one?!”), I will no longer be writing this column.

My exploits in dating on the Oregon Coast have led me to meet a man from the coast (!) who has changed my notion of dating altogether. It has been a wild ride; full of ups and downs and continual learning. Thank you for your feedback, for reading this column and for caring about connection as much as I do.

Please stay in touch; you can reach me via my website at: www.heatherstrang.com. Date on!


The Futrelle Sisters Return in Southern Hospitality

TAPA

Diane Ericson, Lora Ressler, Joni Sauer-Folger, Regina Eckles portray Southern sisterhood on the TAPA stage.

Southern Hospitality, is the funny sequel to TAPA’s last season’s comedy, Christmas Belles. The Futrelle Sisters – Frankie, Twink, Honey Raye and Rhonda Lynn are in trouble again. How they pull together and save their town is a testament to Southern strength and ingenuity, and a recipe for total hilarity.

At the Barn Community Playhouse, 12th and Ivy in Tillamook. 7pm, Fridays and Saturdays through April 16, Sunday Mat, April 10 at 2pm. Tickets: $12 for adults, $9 for seniors and students, and a family four-pack can be purchased for $35.

Reservations and advanced tickets available at Diamond Art Jewelers; call (503) 842-7940. Doors open one half hour prior to curtain.


Tillamook County Women’s Resource Center Spring 2011 Volunteer Training

Begins: April 26th Where: 1902 2nd Street, Tillamook. Pre-screening required.

Contact: Eleanor Watkins, Volunteer Coordinator for appointment at 503-842-9486, M-F ~ 9-5 or tcwrc4@oregoncoast.com. Volunteer position include: Hotline volunteers; Office support; Fundraising; Publicity Maintenance; Direct Services; Board of Directors; Speakers Bureau.